Fragility fractures and health-related quality of life: does socio-economic status widen the gap? A population-based study

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Fragility fractures and health-related quality of life : does socio-economic status widen the gap? A population-based study. / Valentin, G.; Friis, K.; Nielsen, C. P.; Larsen, F. B.; Langdahl, B. L.

In: Osteoporosis International, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.2021, p. 63-73.

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@article{45e84c672f994f25a5dab2e3a2f2b8ce,
title = "Fragility fractures and health-related quality of life: does socio-economic status widen the gap? A population-based study",
abstract = "Summary: Studying 12,839 fracture cases and 91,426 controls, we found that fractures of the spine and hip are associated with clinically important HRQoL deficits up to 5 years post-fracture. Fracture cases with a low educational attainment are more likely to report very low HRQoL due to a low pre-fracture HRQoL. Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the short-term and long-term impact of fractures on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and to study the effect of educational attainment as a proxy for socio-economic status (SES) on post-fracture HRQoL. Methods: In a population-based survey including 12,839 fracture cases and 91,426 controls, HRQoL was measured using the physical component score (PCS) and the mental component score (MCS) of the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). Information about fractures, age, sex, ethnicity, comorbidity and SES was obtained from national registers. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to measure the mean HRQoL difference, termed deficit, between non-fracture controls and fracture cases (all fractures combined and fractures at six different skeletal sites). Results: PCS and MCS were significantly lower among fracture cases than among controls. Statistically and clinically important PCS deficits (≥ 5 points) were observed among people with fractures of the spine and hip up to 5 years post-fracture and among people with upper arm fractures up to 1 year post-fracture. Greater deficits were observed for MCS but not for PCS in post-fracture HRQoL in the low than in the high SES group. Conclusion: Fractures of the spine and hip are associated with clinically important deficits in physical HRQoL up to 5 years post-fracture. Low educational attainment widened the gap in mental but not in physical post-fracture HRQoL. However, due to low pre-fracture PCS and MCS, people with a low educational attainment and fractures were more likely to report very low HRQoL post-fracture.",
keywords = "Fractures, Health survey, Health-related quality of life, Inequality, Population-based study, Socio-economic status",
author = "G. Valentin and K. Friis and Nielsen, {C. P.} and Larsen, {F. B.} and Langdahl, {B. L.}",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1007/s00198-020-05540-8",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "63--73",
journal = "Osteoporosis International",
issn = "0937-941X",
publisher = "Springer U K",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fragility fractures and health-related quality of life

T2 - does socio-economic status widen the gap? A population-based study

AU - Valentin, G.

AU - Friis, K.

AU - Nielsen, C. P.

AU - Larsen, F. B.

AU - Langdahl, B. L.

PY - 2021/1

Y1 - 2021/1

N2 - Summary: Studying 12,839 fracture cases and 91,426 controls, we found that fractures of the spine and hip are associated with clinically important HRQoL deficits up to 5 years post-fracture. Fracture cases with a low educational attainment are more likely to report very low HRQoL due to a low pre-fracture HRQoL. Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the short-term and long-term impact of fractures on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and to study the effect of educational attainment as a proxy for socio-economic status (SES) on post-fracture HRQoL. Methods: In a population-based survey including 12,839 fracture cases and 91,426 controls, HRQoL was measured using the physical component score (PCS) and the mental component score (MCS) of the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). Information about fractures, age, sex, ethnicity, comorbidity and SES was obtained from national registers. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to measure the mean HRQoL difference, termed deficit, between non-fracture controls and fracture cases (all fractures combined and fractures at six different skeletal sites). Results: PCS and MCS were significantly lower among fracture cases than among controls. Statistically and clinically important PCS deficits (≥ 5 points) were observed among people with fractures of the spine and hip up to 5 years post-fracture and among people with upper arm fractures up to 1 year post-fracture. Greater deficits were observed for MCS but not for PCS in post-fracture HRQoL in the low than in the high SES group. Conclusion: Fractures of the spine and hip are associated with clinically important deficits in physical HRQoL up to 5 years post-fracture. Low educational attainment widened the gap in mental but not in physical post-fracture HRQoL. However, due to low pre-fracture PCS and MCS, people with a low educational attainment and fractures were more likely to report very low HRQoL post-fracture.

AB - Summary: Studying 12,839 fracture cases and 91,426 controls, we found that fractures of the spine and hip are associated with clinically important HRQoL deficits up to 5 years post-fracture. Fracture cases with a low educational attainment are more likely to report very low HRQoL due to a low pre-fracture HRQoL. Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the short-term and long-term impact of fractures on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and to study the effect of educational attainment as a proxy for socio-economic status (SES) on post-fracture HRQoL. Methods: In a population-based survey including 12,839 fracture cases and 91,426 controls, HRQoL was measured using the physical component score (PCS) and the mental component score (MCS) of the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). Information about fractures, age, sex, ethnicity, comorbidity and SES was obtained from national registers. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to measure the mean HRQoL difference, termed deficit, between non-fracture controls and fracture cases (all fractures combined and fractures at six different skeletal sites). Results: PCS and MCS were significantly lower among fracture cases than among controls. Statistically and clinically important PCS deficits (≥ 5 points) were observed among people with fractures of the spine and hip up to 5 years post-fracture and among people with upper arm fractures up to 1 year post-fracture. Greater deficits were observed for MCS but not for PCS in post-fracture HRQoL in the low than in the high SES group. Conclusion: Fractures of the spine and hip are associated with clinically important deficits in physical HRQoL up to 5 years post-fracture. Low educational attainment widened the gap in mental but not in physical post-fracture HRQoL. However, due to low pre-fracture PCS and MCS, people with a low educational attainment and fractures were more likely to report very low HRQoL post-fracture.

KW - Fractures

KW - Health survey

KW - Health-related quality of life

KW - Inequality

KW - Population-based study

KW - Socio-economic status

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85088137606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00198-020-05540-8

DO - 10.1007/s00198-020-05540-8

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32681362

AN - SCOPUS:85088137606

VL - 32

SP - 63

EP - 73

JO - Osteoporosis International

JF - Osteoporosis International

SN - 0937-941X

IS - 1

ER -