Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe: a 1-year prospective cohort study

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Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe : a 1-year prospective cohort study. / Nielsen, R.O.; Buist, Ida; Parner, Erik Thorlund et al.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 6, 08.2014, p. 440-447.

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Nielsen RO, Buist I, Parner ET, Nohr EA, Sørensen H, Lind M et al. Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe: a 1-year prospective cohort study. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2014 Aug;48(6):440-447. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2013-092202

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@article{e15ae933581c428481ae43d1b6084ec0,
title = "Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe: a 1-year prospective cohort study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate if running distance to first running-related injury varies between foot postures in novice runners wearing neutral shoes. DESIGN: A 1-year epidemiological observational prospective cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 927 novice runners equivalent to 1854 feet were included. At baseline, foot posture on each foot was evaluated using the foot-posture index and categorised into highly supinated (n=53), supinated (n=369), neutral (n=1292), pronated (n=122) or highly pronated (n=18). Participants then had to start running in a neutral running shoe and to use global positioning system watch to quantify the running distance in every training session. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: A running-related injury was defined as any musculoskeletal complaint of the lower extremity or back caused by running, which restricted the amount of running for at least 1 week. RESULTS: During 1 year of follow-up, the 1854 feet included in the analyses ran a total of 326 803 km until injury or censoring. A total of 252 participants sustained a running-related injury. Of these, 63 were bilateral injuries. Compared with a neutral foot posture, no significant body mass index-adjusted cumulative risk differences (RD) were found after 250 km of running for highly supinated feet (RD=11.0% (-10% to 32.1%), p=0.30), supinated feet (RD=-1.4% (-8.4% to 5.5%), p=0.69), pronated feet (RD=-8.1% (-17.6% to 1.3%), p=0.09) and highly pronated feet (RD=9.8% (-19.3% to 38.8%), p=0.51). In addition, the incidence-rate difference/1000 km of running, revealed that pronators had a significantly lower number of injuries/1000 km of running of -0.37 (-0.03 to -0.70), p=0.03 than neutrals. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study contradict the widespread belief that moderate foot pronation is associated with an increased risk of injury among novice runners taking up running in a neutral running shoe. More work is needed to ascertain if highly pronated feet face a higher risk of injury than neutral feet.",
author = "R.O. Nielsen and Ida Buist and Parner, {Erik Thorlund} and Nohr, {Ellen Aagaard} and Henrik S{\o}rensen and Martin Lind and Sten Rasmussen",
year = "2014",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1136/bjsports-2013-092202",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "440--447",
journal = "British Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0306-3674",
publisher = "B M J Group",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe

T2 - a 1-year prospective cohort study

AU - Nielsen, R.O.

AU - Buist, Ida

AU - Parner, Erik Thorlund

AU - Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

AU - Sørensen, Henrik

AU - Lind, Martin

AU - Rasmussen, Sten

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate if running distance to first running-related injury varies between foot postures in novice runners wearing neutral shoes. DESIGN: A 1-year epidemiological observational prospective cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 927 novice runners equivalent to 1854 feet were included. At baseline, foot posture on each foot was evaluated using the foot-posture index and categorised into highly supinated (n=53), supinated (n=369), neutral (n=1292), pronated (n=122) or highly pronated (n=18). Participants then had to start running in a neutral running shoe and to use global positioning system watch to quantify the running distance in every training session. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: A running-related injury was defined as any musculoskeletal complaint of the lower extremity or back caused by running, which restricted the amount of running for at least 1 week. RESULTS: During 1 year of follow-up, the 1854 feet included in the analyses ran a total of 326 803 km until injury or censoring. A total of 252 participants sustained a running-related injury. Of these, 63 were bilateral injuries. Compared with a neutral foot posture, no significant body mass index-adjusted cumulative risk differences (RD) were found after 250 km of running for highly supinated feet (RD=11.0% (-10% to 32.1%), p=0.30), supinated feet (RD=-1.4% (-8.4% to 5.5%), p=0.69), pronated feet (RD=-8.1% (-17.6% to 1.3%), p=0.09) and highly pronated feet (RD=9.8% (-19.3% to 38.8%), p=0.51). In addition, the incidence-rate difference/1000 km of running, revealed that pronators had a significantly lower number of injuries/1000 km of running of -0.37 (-0.03 to -0.70), p=0.03 than neutrals. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study contradict the widespread belief that moderate foot pronation is associated with an increased risk of injury among novice runners taking up running in a neutral running shoe. More work is needed to ascertain if highly pronated feet face a higher risk of injury than neutral feet.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate if running distance to first running-related injury varies between foot postures in novice runners wearing neutral shoes. DESIGN: A 1-year epidemiological observational prospective cohort study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 927 novice runners equivalent to 1854 feet were included. At baseline, foot posture on each foot was evaluated using the foot-posture index and categorised into highly supinated (n=53), supinated (n=369), neutral (n=1292), pronated (n=122) or highly pronated (n=18). Participants then had to start running in a neutral running shoe and to use global positioning system watch to quantify the running distance in every training session. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: A running-related injury was defined as any musculoskeletal complaint of the lower extremity or back caused by running, which restricted the amount of running for at least 1 week. RESULTS: During 1 year of follow-up, the 1854 feet included in the analyses ran a total of 326 803 km until injury or censoring. A total of 252 participants sustained a running-related injury. Of these, 63 were bilateral injuries. Compared with a neutral foot posture, no significant body mass index-adjusted cumulative risk differences (RD) were found after 250 km of running for highly supinated feet (RD=11.0% (-10% to 32.1%), p=0.30), supinated feet (RD=-1.4% (-8.4% to 5.5%), p=0.69), pronated feet (RD=-8.1% (-17.6% to 1.3%), p=0.09) and highly pronated feet (RD=9.8% (-19.3% to 38.8%), p=0.51). In addition, the incidence-rate difference/1000 km of running, revealed that pronators had a significantly lower number of injuries/1000 km of running of -0.37 (-0.03 to -0.70), p=0.03 than neutrals. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study contradict the widespread belief that moderate foot pronation is associated with an increased risk of injury among novice runners taking up running in a neutral running shoe. More work is needed to ascertain if highly pronated feet face a higher risk of injury than neutral feet.

U2 - 10.1136/bjsports-2013-092202

DO - 10.1136/bjsports-2013-092202

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 23766439

VL - 48

SP - 440

EP - 447

JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0306-3674

IS - 6

ER -