Enzyme-functionalized DNA nanostructures as tools for organizing and controlling enzymatic reactions

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Enzyme-functionalized DNA nanostructures as tools for organizing and controlling enzymatic reactions. / Grossi, Guido; Jaekel, Andreas; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Sacca, Barbara.

In: MRS Bulletin, Vol. 42, No. 12, 12.2017, p. 920-924.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Grossi, Guido ; Jaekel, Andreas ; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth ; Sacca, Barbara. / Enzyme-functionalized DNA nanostructures as tools for organizing and controlling enzymatic reactions. In: MRS Bulletin. 2017 ; Vol. 42, No. 12. pp. 920-924.

Bibtex

@article{6dc71baf11c847cfbdf8c7ed6093f1ed,
title = "Enzyme-functionalized DNA nanostructures as tools for organizing and controlling enzymatic reactions",
abstract = "Enzyme sequestration and compartmentalization are key factors in cell signaling and metabolism, evolved to solve the challenges of slow turnover rates, undesired pathway intermediates, and competing reactions. Inspired by nature, DNA nanoengineers have developed organizational systems to confine enzymes in two- and three-dimensional environments and to actuate them in response to precise external stimuli. DNA-scaffolded enzymes have applications for not only the in vitro reconstitution of proteins, peptides, and other molecular assemblies, but also to enable the generation of advanced functional nanomaterials for the development of, for example, fuel cells, biosensors, and drug delivery systems. Despite several challenges that still remain unsolved, the use of DNA scaffolds to arrange enzymes in space and time will help to realize biochemical nanofactories, where multiple components work together to produce novel and improved functional materials, rivaling the efficiency of biological systems.",
keywords = "ORIGAMI NANOSTRUCTURES, MULTIENZYME COMPLEXES, BIOCATALYTIC CASCADES, PROTEIN-BINDING, ENCAPSULATION, STABILITY, SCAFFOLDS, NANOSCALE, NANOREACTOR, ENHANCEMENT",
author = "Guido Grossi and Andreas Jaekel and Andersen, {Ebbe Sloth} and Barbara Sacca",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1557/mrs.2017.269",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "920--924",
journal = "MRS Bulletin",
issn = "0883-7694",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enzyme-functionalized DNA nanostructures as tools for organizing and controlling enzymatic reactions

AU - Grossi, Guido

AU - Jaekel, Andreas

AU - Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

AU - Sacca, Barbara

PY - 2017/12

Y1 - 2017/12

N2 - Enzyme sequestration and compartmentalization are key factors in cell signaling and metabolism, evolved to solve the challenges of slow turnover rates, undesired pathway intermediates, and competing reactions. Inspired by nature, DNA nanoengineers have developed organizational systems to confine enzymes in two- and three-dimensional environments and to actuate them in response to precise external stimuli. DNA-scaffolded enzymes have applications for not only the in vitro reconstitution of proteins, peptides, and other molecular assemblies, but also to enable the generation of advanced functional nanomaterials for the development of, for example, fuel cells, biosensors, and drug delivery systems. Despite several challenges that still remain unsolved, the use of DNA scaffolds to arrange enzymes in space and time will help to realize biochemical nanofactories, where multiple components work together to produce novel and improved functional materials, rivaling the efficiency of biological systems.

AB - Enzyme sequestration and compartmentalization are key factors in cell signaling and metabolism, evolved to solve the challenges of slow turnover rates, undesired pathway intermediates, and competing reactions. Inspired by nature, DNA nanoengineers have developed organizational systems to confine enzymes in two- and three-dimensional environments and to actuate them in response to precise external stimuli. DNA-scaffolded enzymes have applications for not only the in vitro reconstitution of proteins, peptides, and other molecular assemblies, but also to enable the generation of advanced functional nanomaterials for the development of, for example, fuel cells, biosensors, and drug delivery systems. Despite several challenges that still remain unsolved, the use of DNA scaffolds to arrange enzymes in space and time will help to realize biochemical nanofactories, where multiple components work together to produce novel and improved functional materials, rivaling the efficiency of biological systems.

KW - ORIGAMI NANOSTRUCTURES

KW - MULTIENZYME COMPLEXES

KW - BIOCATALYTIC CASCADES

KW - PROTEIN-BINDING

KW - ENCAPSULATION

KW - STABILITY

KW - SCAFFOLDS

KW - NANOSCALE

KW - NANOREACTOR

KW - ENHANCEMENT

U2 - 10.1557/mrs.2017.269

DO - 10.1557/mrs.2017.269

M3 - Journal article

VL - 42

SP - 920

EP - 924

JO - MRS Bulletin

JF - MRS Bulletin

SN - 0883-7694

IS - 12

ER -