Effect of long-term remote ischemic conditioning on inflammation and cardiac remodeling

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Effect of long-term remote ischemic conditioning on inflammation and cardiac remodeling. / Pryds, Kasper; Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Bjerre, Mette; Thiel, Steffen; Refsgaard, Jens; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Østgård, René Drage; Nielsen, Roni Ranghøj.

In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, Vol. 53, No. 4, 07.2019, p. 183-191.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{1a67bb8e0fdc4d1ab854cfc307d4d307,
title = "Effect of long-term remote ischemic conditioning on inflammation and cardiac remodeling",
abstract = "Background. Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) protects against acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and may have beneficial effects in patients with stable cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effect of long-term RIC treatment in patients with chronic ischemic heart failure (CIHF). Methods. Prespecified post-hoc analysis of a prospective, exploratory and outcome-assessor blinded study. Twenty-one patients with compensated CIHF and 21 matched controls without heart failure or ischemic heart disease were treated with RIC once daily for 28 ± 4 days. RIC was conducted as 4 cycles of 5 minutes upper arm ischemia followed by 5 minutes of reperfusion. We evaluated circulating markers of inflammation and cardiac remodeling at baseline and following long-term RIC. Results. RIC reduced C-reactive protein from 1.5 (0.6–2.5) to 1.3 (0.6–2.1) mg/l following long-term RIC treatment (p =.02) and calprotectin from 477 (95{\%} CI 380 to 600) to 434 (95{\%} CI 354 to 533) ng/ml (p =.03) in patients with CIHF, but not in matched controls. Overall, RIC did not affect circulating markers related to adaptive or innate immunology or cardiac remodeling in patients with CIHF. Among patients with CIHF and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) plasma levels above the geometric mean of 372 ng/l, long-term RIC treatment reduced soluble ST2 (n = 9) from 22.0 ± 3.7 to 20.3 ± 3.9 ng/ml following long-term RIC treatment (p =.01). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that long-term RIC treatment has mild anti-inflammatory effects in patients with compensated CIHF and anti-remodeling effects in those with increased NT-proBNP levels. This should be further investigated in a randomized sham-controlled trial.",
keywords = "Ischemic heart disease, cardiac remodeling, heart failure, inflammation, ischemic preconditioning, remote ischemic conditioning, COMPLEMENT, PATTERN-RECOGNITION MOLECULES, HEART-FAILURE, CALPROTECTIN, MICROCIRCULATION, NEUTROPHILS, CRISP STENT, MANNAN-BINDING LECTIN, PATHWAY, ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION",
author = "Kasper Pryds and Schmidt, {Michael Rahbek} and Mette Bjerre and Steffen Thiel and Jens Refsgaard and B{\o}tker, {Hans Erik} and {\O}stg{\aa}rd, {Ren{\'e} Drage} and Nielsen, {Roni Rangh{\o}j}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1080/14017431.2019.1622770",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "183--191",
journal = "Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal",
issn = "1401-7431",
publisher = "Taylor & francis",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of long-term remote ischemic conditioning on inflammation and cardiac remodeling

AU - Pryds, Kasper

AU - Schmidt, Michael Rahbek

AU - Bjerre, Mette

AU - Thiel, Steffen

AU - Refsgaard, Jens

AU - Bøtker, Hans Erik

AU - Østgård, René Drage

AU - Nielsen, Roni Ranghøj

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - Background. Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) protects against acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and may have beneficial effects in patients with stable cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effect of long-term RIC treatment in patients with chronic ischemic heart failure (CIHF). Methods. Prespecified post-hoc analysis of a prospective, exploratory and outcome-assessor blinded study. Twenty-one patients with compensated CIHF and 21 matched controls without heart failure or ischemic heart disease were treated with RIC once daily for 28 ± 4 days. RIC was conducted as 4 cycles of 5 minutes upper arm ischemia followed by 5 minutes of reperfusion. We evaluated circulating markers of inflammation and cardiac remodeling at baseline and following long-term RIC. Results. RIC reduced C-reactive protein from 1.5 (0.6–2.5) to 1.3 (0.6–2.1) mg/l following long-term RIC treatment (p =.02) and calprotectin from 477 (95% CI 380 to 600) to 434 (95% CI 354 to 533) ng/ml (p =.03) in patients with CIHF, but not in matched controls. Overall, RIC did not affect circulating markers related to adaptive or innate immunology or cardiac remodeling in patients with CIHF. Among patients with CIHF and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) plasma levels above the geometric mean of 372 ng/l, long-term RIC treatment reduced soluble ST2 (n = 9) from 22.0 ± 3.7 to 20.3 ± 3.9 ng/ml following long-term RIC treatment (p =.01). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that long-term RIC treatment has mild anti-inflammatory effects in patients with compensated CIHF and anti-remodeling effects in those with increased NT-proBNP levels. This should be further investigated in a randomized sham-controlled trial.

AB - Background. Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) protects against acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and may have beneficial effects in patients with stable cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effect of long-term RIC treatment in patients with chronic ischemic heart failure (CIHF). Methods. Prespecified post-hoc analysis of a prospective, exploratory and outcome-assessor blinded study. Twenty-one patients with compensated CIHF and 21 matched controls without heart failure or ischemic heart disease were treated with RIC once daily for 28 ± 4 days. RIC was conducted as 4 cycles of 5 minutes upper arm ischemia followed by 5 minutes of reperfusion. We evaluated circulating markers of inflammation and cardiac remodeling at baseline and following long-term RIC. Results. RIC reduced C-reactive protein from 1.5 (0.6–2.5) to 1.3 (0.6–2.1) mg/l following long-term RIC treatment (p =.02) and calprotectin from 477 (95% CI 380 to 600) to 434 (95% CI 354 to 533) ng/ml (p =.03) in patients with CIHF, but not in matched controls. Overall, RIC did not affect circulating markers related to adaptive or innate immunology or cardiac remodeling in patients with CIHF. Among patients with CIHF and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) plasma levels above the geometric mean of 372 ng/l, long-term RIC treatment reduced soluble ST2 (n = 9) from 22.0 ± 3.7 to 20.3 ± 3.9 ng/ml following long-term RIC treatment (p =.01). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that long-term RIC treatment has mild anti-inflammatory effects in patients with compensated CIHF and anti-remodeling effects in those with increased NT-proBNP levels. This should be further investigated in a randomized sham-controlled trial.

KW - Ischemic heart disease

KW - cardiac remodeling

KW - heart failure

KW - inflammation

KW - ischemic preconditioning

KW - remote ischemic conditioning

KW - COMPLEMENT

KW - PATTERN-RECOGNITION MOLECULES

KW - HEART-FAILURE

KW - CALPROTECTIN

KW - MICROCIRCULATION

KW - NEUTROPHILS

KW - CRISP STENT

KW - MANNAN-BINDING LECTIN

KW - PATHWAY

KW - ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066972446&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/14017431.2019.1622770

DO - 10.1080/14017431.2019.1622770

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31117835

VL - 53

SP - 183

EP - 191

JO - Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal

JF - Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal

SN - 1401-7431

IS - 4

ER -