Department of Economics and Business Economics

Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease

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Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease. / Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte; Thornton, Laura M; Quaranta, Michela; Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Pisetsky, David; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Bulik, Cynthia M.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 140, No. 6, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Zerwas, S, Larsen, JT, Petersen, L, Thornton, LM, Quaranta, M, Koch, SV, Pisetsky, D, Mortensen, PB & Bulik, CM 2017, 'Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease', Pediatrics, vol. 140, no. 6. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-2089

APA

Zerwas, S., Larsen, J. T., Petersen, L., Thornton, L. M., Quaranta, M., Koch, S. V., Pisetsky, D., Mortensen, P. B., & Bulik, C. M. (2017). Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease. Pediatrics, 140(6). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-2089

CBE

Zerwas S, Larsen JT, Petersen L, Thornton LM, Quaranta M, Koch SV, Pisetsky D, Mortensen PB, Bulik CM. 2017. Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease. Pediatrics. 140(6). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2016-2089

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Zerwas, Stephanie ; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak ; Petersen, Liselotte ; Thornton, Laura M ; Quaranta, Michela ; Koch, Susanne Vinkel ; Pisetsky, David ; Mortensen, Preben Bo ; Bulik, Cynthia M. / Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease. In: Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 140, No. 6.

Bibtex

@article{4377938a2a9649d9a1374e225441b4ab,
title = "Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands.METHODS: In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations.RESULTS: We found significantly higher hazards of eating disorders for children and adolescents with autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases: 36% higher hazard for anorexia nervosa, 73% for bulimia nervosa, and 72% for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. The association was particularly strong in boys. Parental autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease history was associated with significantly increased odds for anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.25), bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.08-1.55) and for an eating disorder not otherwise specified (OR = 1.27; CI = 1.13-1.44).CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases are associated with increased risk for eating disorders. Ultimately, understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Stephanie Zerwas and Larsen, {Janne Tidselbak} and Liselotte Petersen and Thornton, {Laura M} and Michela Quaranta and Koch, {Susanne Vinkel} and David Pisetsky and Mortensen, {Preben Bo} and Bulik, {Cynthia M}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2016-2089",
language = "English",
volume = "140",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease

AU - Zerwas, Stephanie

AU - Larsen, Janne Tidselbak

AU - Petersen, Liselotte

AU - Thornton, Laura M

AU - Quaranta, Michela

AU - Koch, Susanne Vinkel

AU - Pisetsky, David

AU - Mortensen, Preben Bo

AU - Bulik, Cynthia M

N1 - Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands.METHODS: In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations.RESULTS: We found significantly higher hazards of eating disorders for children and adolescents with autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases: 36% higher hazard for anorexia nervosa, 73% for bulimia nervosa, and 72% for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. The association was particularly strong in boys. Parental autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease history was associated with significantly increased odds for anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.25), bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.08-1.55) and for an eating disorder not otherwise specified (OR = 1.27; CI = 1.13-1.44).CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases are associated with increased risk for eating disorders. Ultimately, understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands.METHODS: In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations.RESULTS: We found significantly higher hazards of eating disorders for children and adolescents with autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases: 36% higher hazard for anorexia nervosa, 73% for bulimia nervosa, and 72% for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. The association was particularly strong in boys. Parental autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease history was associated with significantly increased odds for anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.25), bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.08-1.55) and for an eating disorder not otherwise specified (OR = 1.27; CI = 1.13-1.44).CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases are associated with increased risk for eating disorders. Ultimately, understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2016-2089

DO - 10.1542/peds.2016-2089

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29122972

VL - 140

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 6

ER -