Early-adult outcome of child and adolescent mental disorders as evidenced by a national-based case register survey

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Early-adult outcome of child and adolescent mental disorders as evidenced by a national-based case register survey. / Castagnini, Augusto; Foldager, Leslie; Caffo, Ernesto; Thomsen, Per Hove.

In: European Psychiatry, Vol. 38, 10.2016, p. 45-50.

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@article{a2586d90f9e741c6b410460c69a1f72b,
title = "Early-adult outcome of child and adolescent mental disorders as evidenced by a national-based case register survey",
abstract = "BackgroundMental disorders show varying degrees of continuity from childhood to adulthood. This study addresses the relationship of child and adolescent mental disorders to early adult psychiatric morbidity.MethodsFrom a population at risk of 830,819 children and adolescents aged 6–16 years, we selected all those (n = 6043) who were enrolled for the first time in the Danish Psychiatric Register with an ICD-10 F00–99 diagnosis in 1995–1997, and identified any mental disorder for which they received treatment up to 2009.ResultsNeurodevelopmental and conduct disorders were the principal diagnostic groups at 6–16 years and exhibited a characteristic male preponderance; while affective, eating, neurotic, stress-related and adjustment disorders were more common in girls. Over a mean follow-up period of 10.1 years, 1666 (27.6{\%}) cases, mean age 23.4 years, were referred for treatment to mental health services, and they had a markedly higher risk than the general population (RR 5.1; 95{\%} CI 4.9–5.4). Affective, eating, neurodevelopmental, obsessive–compulsive and psychotic disorders had the strongest continuity. Heterotypic transitions were observed for affective, eating, neurodevelopmental, personality and substance use disorders.ConclusionsThese findings suggest that individuals with psychiatric antecedents in childhood and adolescence had a high risk of being referred for treatment in early adulthood, and many mental disorders for which they required treatment revealed both homotypic and heterotypic continuity.",
author = "Augusto Castagnini and Leslie Foldager and Ernesto Caffo and Thomsen, {Per Hove}",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.04.005",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "45--50",
journal = "European Psychiatry",
issn = "0924-9338",
publisher = "Elsevier Masson",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early-adult outcome of child and adolescent mental disorders as evidenced by a national-based case register survey

AU - Castagnini, Augusto

AU - Foldager, Leslie

AU - Caffo, Ernesto

AU - Thomsen, Per Hove

PY - 2016/10

Y1 - 2016/10

N2 - BackgroundMental disorders show varying degrees of continuity from childhood to adulthood. This study addresses the relationship of child and adolescent mental disorders to early adult psychiatric morbidity.MethodsFrom a population at risk of 830,819 children and adolescents aged 6–16 years, we selected all those (n = 6043) who were enrolled for the first time in the Danish Psychiatric Register with an ICD-10 F00–99 diagnosis in 1995–1997, and identified any mental disorder for which they received treatment up to 2009.ResultsNeurodevelopmental and conduct disorders were the principal diagnostic groups at 6–16 years and exhibited a characteristic male preponderance; while affective, eating, neurotic, stress-related and adjustment disorders were more common in girls. Over a mean follow-up period of 10.1 years, 1666 (27.6%) cases, mean age 23.4 years, were referred for treatment to mental health services, and they had a markedly higher risk than the general population (RR 5.1; 95% CI 4.9–5.4). Affective, eating, neurodevelopmental, obsessive–compulsive and psychotic disorders had the strongest continuity. Heterotypic transitions were observed for affective, eating, neurodevelopmental, personality and substance use disorders.ConclusionsThese findings suggest that individuals with psychiatric antecedents in childhood and adolescence had a high risk of being referred for treatment in early adulthood, and many mental disorders for which they required treatment revealed both homotypic and heterotypic continuity.

AB - BackgroundMental disorders show varying degrees of continuity from childhood to adulthood. This study addresses the relationship of child and adolescent mental disorders to early adult psychiatric morbidity.MethodsFrom a population at risk of 830,819 children and adolescents aged 6–16 years, we selected all those (n = 6043) who were enrolled for the first time in the Danish Psychiatric Register with an ICD-10 F00–99 diagnosis in 1995–1997, and identified any mental disorder for which they received treatment up to 2009.ResultsNeurodevelopmental and conduct disorders were the principal diagnostic groups at 6–16 years and exhibited a characteristic male preponderance; while affective, eating, neurotic, stress-related and adjustment disorders were more common in girls. Over a mean follow-up period of 10.1 years, 1666 (27.6%) cases, mean age 23.4 years, were referred for treatment to mental health services, and they had a markedly higher risk than the general population (RR 5.1; 95% CI 4.9–5.4). Affective, eating, neurodevelopmental, obsessive–compulsive and psychotic disorders had the strongest continuity. Heterotypic transitions were observed for affective, eating, neurodevelopmental, personality and substance use disorders.ConclusionsThese findings suggest that individuals with psychiatric antecedents in childhood and adolescence had a high risk of being referred for treatment in early adulthood, and many mental disorders for which they required treatment revealed both homotypic and heterotypic continuity.

U2 - 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.04.005

DO - 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2016.04.005

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27657665

VL - 38

SP - 45

EP - 50

JO - European Psychiatry

JF - European Psychiatry

SN - 0924-9338

ER -