Department of Management

Do Startups Pay Less?

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Do Startups Pay Less? / Burton, M. Diane; Dahl, Michael Slavensky; Sorenson, Olav.

In: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 71, No. 5, 2018, p. 1179-1200.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Burton, MD, Dahl, MS & Sorenson, O 2018, 'Do Startups Pay Less?', Industrial and Labor Relations Review, vol. 71, no. 5, pp. 1179-1200. https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793917747240

APA

Burton, M. D., Dahl, M. S., & Sorenson, O. (2018). Do Startups Pay Less? Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 71(5), 1179-1200. https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793917747240

CBE

Burton MD, Dahl MS, Sorenson O. 2018. Do Startups Pay Less?. Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 71(5):1179-1200. https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793917747240

MLA

Burton, M. Diane, Michael Slavensky Dahl and Olav Sorenson. "Do Startups Pay Less?". Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 2018, 71(5). 1179-1200. https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793917747240

Vancouver

Burton MD, Dahl MS, Sorenson O. Do Startups Pay Less? Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 2018;71(5):1179-1200. https://doi.org/10.1177/0019793917747240

Author

Burton, M. Diane ; Dahl, Michael Slavensky ; Sorenson, Olav. / Do Startups Pay Less?. In: Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 2018 ; Vol. 71, No. 5. pp. 1179-1200.

Bibtex

@article{86fd2463464941308f6d5e36bf31fdd6,
title = "Do Startups Pay Less?",
abstract = "The authors analyze Danish registry data from 1991 to 2006 todetermine how firm age and firm size influence wages. Unadjustedstatistics suggest that smaller firms paid less than larger firms paid,and that firm age had little or no bearing on wages. After adjustingfor differences in the characteristics of employees hired by thesefirms, however, they observe both firm age and firm size effects.Larger firms paid more than did smaller firms for observationallyequivalent individuals but, contrary to conventional wisdom,younger firms paid more than older firms. The size effect, however,dominates the age effect. Thus, although the typical start-up—beingboth young and small—paid less than a more established employer,the largest start-ups paid a wage premium.",
keywords = "human capital, tenure and wages, wage level, wage structure, wages",
author = "Burton, {M. Diane} and Dahl, {Michael Slavensky} and Olav Sorenson",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1177/0019793917747240",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "1179--1200",
journal = "Industrial and Labor Relations Review",
issn = "0019-7939",
publisher = "Sage Publications, Inc.",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do Startups Pay Less?

AU - Burton, M. Diane

AU - Dahl, Michael Slavensky

AU - Sorenson, Olav

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The authors analyze Danish registry data from 1991 to 2006 todetermine how firm age and firm size influence wages. Unadjustedstatistics suggest that smaller firms paid less than larger firms paid,and that firm age had little or no bearing on wages. After adjustingfor differences in the characteristics of employees hired by thesefirms, however, they observe both firm age and firm size effects.Larger firms paid more than did smaller firms for observationallyequivalent individuals but, contrary to conventional wisdom,younger firms paid more than older firms. The size effect, however,dominates the age effect. Thus, although the typical start-up—beingboth young and small—paid less than a more established employer,the largest start-ups paid a wage premium.

AB - The authors analyze Danish registry data from 1991 to 2006 todetermine how firm age and firm size influence wages. Unadjustedstatistics suggest that smaller firms paid less than larger firms paid,and that firm age had little or no bearing on wages. After adjustingfor differences in the characteristics of employees hired by thesefirms, however, they observe both firm age and firm size effects.Larger firms paid more than did smaller firms for observationallyequivalent individuals but, contrary to conventional wisdom,younger firms paid more than older firms. The size effect, however,dominates the age effect. Thus, although the typical start-up—beingboth young and small—paid less than a more established employer,the largest start-ups paid a wage premium.

KW - human capital

KW - tenure and wages

KW - wage level

KW - wage structure

KW - wages

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042913923&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0019793917747240

DO - 10.1177/0019793917747240

M3 - Journal article

VL - 71

SP - 1179

EP - 1200

JO - Industrial and Labor Relations Review

JF - Industrial and Labor Relations Review

SN - 0019-7939

IS - 5

ER -