Do probiotics prevent colonization with multi-resistant Enterobacteriaceae during travel? A randomized controlled trial

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Do probiotics prevent colonization with multi-resistant Enterobacteriaceae during travel? A randomized controlled trial. / Dall, Laura Boysen; Lausch, Karen Rokkedal; Gedebjerg, Anne; Fuursted, Kurt; Storgaard, Merete; Larsen, Carsten Schade.

In: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, Vol. 27, 02.2019, p. 81-86.

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Dall, Laura Boysen ; Lausch, Karen Rokkedal ; Gedebjerg, Anne ; Fuursted, Kurt ; Storgaard, Merete ; Larsen, Carsten Schade. / Do probiotics prevent colonization with multi-resistant Enterobacteriaceae during travel? A randomized controlled trial. In: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease. 2019 ; Vol. 27. pp. 81-86.

Bibtex

@article{acf9d26fba67456ca968d5cc0a3ee789,
title = "Do probiotics prevent colonization with multi-resistant Enterobacteriaceae during travel?: A randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Travelers to India are often colonized with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) or Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). The aim of this study was to investigate if the probiotic species Lactobacillus Rhamnosus GG (LGG) could prevent the colonization of the gut with multi-drug resistant bacteria.METHODS: Adult Danish travelers traveling to India for 10-28 days were randomized to receive either LGG or no probiotics during travel. Rectal swabs and questionnaires were obtained before travel, immediately after and six months after return. Swaps were screened for the presence of ESBL-E and CPE.RESULTS: 31 travelers were randomized to the LGG group and 30 to the control group. Before traveling, 6/50 (12.0%) were colonized with ESBL-E. After return, 41/44 (93.2%) of those not colonized before travel were colonized and 11/36 (30.6%) were still colonized after six months. There was no statistically significant difference in the colonization rate between the group receiving LGG and the control group. No CPE was detected in any cases.CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the very high incidence of colonization with ESBL-E associated with travel to India with >90% colonized upon return and one third were intestinal carriers for at least six months. Use of LGG did not have any effect on the risk of colonization with ESBL-E.",
keywords = "CPE, Colonization, ESBL-E, India, Probiotic, Traveler, CARRIAGE, ACQUISITION, ESCHERICHIA-COLI, LACTAMASE-PRODUCING ENTEROBACTERIACEAE, RISK, Prospective Studies, Enterobacteriaceae/drug effects, Humans, Middle Aged, Probiotics/administration & dosage, Male, Incidence, Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial, Adult, Female, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Risk Factors, Intestines/microbiology, Bacterial Proteins, Travel, Feces/microbiology, beta-Lactamases, Enterobacteriaceae Infections/prevention & control, Diarrhea/prevention & control",
author = "Dall, {Laura Boysen} and Lausch, {Karen Rokkedal} and Anne Gedebjerg and Kurt Fuursted and Merete Storgaard and Larsen, {Carsten Schade}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1016/j.tmaid.2018.11.013",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "81--86",
journal = "Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease",
issn = "1477-8939",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do probiotics prevent colonization with multi-resistant Enterobacteriaceae during travel?

T2 - A randomized controlled trial

AU - Dall, Laura Boysen

AU - Lausch, Karen Rokkedal

AU - Gedebjerg, Anne

AU - Fuursted, Kurt

AU - Storgaard, Merete

AU - Larsen, Carsten Schade

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - BACKGROUND: Travelers to India are often colonized with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) or Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). The aim of this study was to investigate if the probiotic species Lactobacillus Rhamnosus GG (LGG) could prevent the colonization of the gut with multi-drug resistant bacteria.METHODS: Adult Danish travelers traveling to India for 10-28 days were randomized to receive either LGG or no probiotics during travel. Rectal swabs and questionnaires were obtained before travel, immediately after and six months after return. Swaps were screened for the presence of ESBL-E and CPE.RESULTS: 31 travelers were randomized to the LGG group and 30 to the control group. Before traveling, 6/50 (12.0%) were colonized with ESBL-E. After return, 41/44 (93.2%) of those not colonized before travel were colonized and 11/36 (30.6%) were still colonized after six months. There was no statistically significant difference in the colonization rate between the group receiving LGG and the control group. No CPE was detected in any cases.CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the very high incidence of colonization with ESBL-E associated with travel to India with >90% colonized upon return and one third were intestinal carriers for at least six months. Use of LGG did not have any effect on the risk of colonization with ESBL-E.

AB - BACKGROUND: Travelers to India are often colonized with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) or Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). The aim of this study was to investigate if the probiotic species Lactobacillus Rhamnosus GG (LGG) could prevent the colonization of the gut with multi-drug resistant bacteria.METHODS: Adult Danish travelers traveling to India for 10-28 days were randomized to receive either LGG or no probiotics during travel. Rectal swabs and questionnaires were obtained before travel, immediately after and six months after return. Swaps were screened for the presence of ESBL-E and CPE.RESULTS: 31 travelers were randomized to the LGG group and 30 to the control group. Before traveling, 6/50 (12.0%) were colonized with ESBL-E. After return, 41/44 (93.2%) of those not colonized before travel were colonized and 11/36 (30.6%) were still colonized after six months. There was no statistically significant difference in the colonization rate between the group receiving LGG and the control group. No CPE was detected in any cases.CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the very high incidence of colonization with ESBL-E associated with travel to India with >90% colonized upon return and one third were intestinal carriers for at least six months. Use of LGG did not have any effect on the risk of colonization with ESBL-E.

KW - CPE

KW - Colonization

KW - ESBL-E

KW - India

KW - Probiotic

KW - Traveler

KW - CARRIAGE

KW - ACQUISITION

KW - ESCHERICHIA-COLI

KW - LACTAMASE-PRODUCING ENTEROBACTERIACEAE

KW - RISK

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Enterobacteriaceae/drug effects

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Probiotics/administration & dosage

KW - Male

KW - Incidence

KW - Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Lactobacillus rhamnosus

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Intestines/microbiology

KW - Bacterial Proteins

KW - Travel

KW - Feces/microbiology

KW - beta-Lactamases

KW - Enterobacteriaceae Infections/prevention & control

KW - Diarrhea/prevention & control

U2 - 10.1016/j.tmaid.2018.11.013

DO - 10.1016/j.tmaid.2018.11.013

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30508633

VL - 27

SP - 81

EP - 86

JO - Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease

JF - Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease

SN - 1477-8939

ER -