Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Distinct criticality of phase and amplitude dynamics in the resting brain

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

Standard

Distinct criticality of phase and amplitude dynamics in the resting brain. / Daffertshofer, Andreas; Ton, Robert; Kringelbach, Morten L; Woolrich, Mark; Deco, Gustavo.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 180, 15.10.2018, p. 442-447.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Daffertshofer, A, Ton, R, Kringelbach, ML, Woolrich, M & Deco, G 2018, 'Distinct criticality of phase and amplitude dynamics in the resting brain', NeuroImage, vol. 180, pp. 442-447. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.03.002

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Daffertshofer, Andreas ; Ton, Robert ; Kringelbach, Morten L ; Woolrich, Mark ; Deco, Gustavo. / Distinct criticality of phase and amplitude dynamics in the resting brain. In: NeuroImage. 2018 ; Vol. 180. pp. 442-447.

Bibtex

@article{36020a9dd1124d1b958aa6ff90bb9990,
title = "Distinct criticality of phase and amplitude dynamics in the resting brain",
abstract = "Converging research suggests that the resting brain operates at the cusp of dynamic instability, as signified by scale-free temporal correlations. We asked whether the scaling properties of these correlations differ between amplitude and phase fluctuations, which may reflect different aspects of cortical functioning. Using source-reconstructed magneto-encephalographic signals, we found power-law scaling for the collective amplitude and for phase synchronization, both capturing whole-brain activity. The temporal changes of the amplitude comprise slow, persistent memory processes, whereas phase synchronization exhibits less temporally structured and more complex correlations, indicating a fast and flexible coding. This distinct temporal scaling supports the idea of different roles of amplitude and phase fluctuations in cortical functioning.",
author = "Andreas Daffertshofer and Robert Ton and Kringelbach, {Morten L} and Mark Woolrich and Gustavo Deco",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = oct,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.03.002",
language = "English",
volume = "180",
pages = "442--447",
journal = "NeuroImage",
issn = "1053-8119",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Distinct criticality of phase and amplitude dynamics in the resting brain

AU - Daffertshofer, Andreas

AU - Ton, Robert

AU - Kringelbach, Morten L

AU - Woolrich, Mark

AU - Deco, Gustavo

N1 - Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/10/15

Y1 - 2018/10/15

N2 - Converging research suggests that the resting brain operates at the cusp of dynamic instability, as signified by scale-free temporal correlations. We asked whether the scaling properties of these correlations differ between amplitude and phase fluctuations, which may reflect different aspects of cortical functioning. Using source-reconstructed magneto-encephalographic signals, we found power-law scaling for the collective amplitude and for phase synchronization, both capturing whole-brain activity. The temporal changes of the amplitude comprise slow, persistent memory processes, whereas phase synchronization exhibits less temporally structured and more complex correlations, indicating a fast and flexible coding. This distinct temporal scaling supports the idea of different roles of amplitude and phase fluctuations in cortical functioning.

AB - Converging research suggests that the resting brain operates at the cusp of dynamic instability, as signified by scale-free temporal correlations. We asked whether the scaling properties of these correlations differ between amplitude and phase fluctuations, which may reflect different aspects of cortical functioning. Using source-reconstructed magneto-encephalographic signals, we found power-law scaling for the collective amplitude and for phase synchronization, both capturing whole-brain activity. The temporal changes of the amplitude comprise slow, persistent memory processes, whereas phase synchronization exhibits less temporally structured and more complex correlations, indicating a fast and flexible coding. This distinct temporal scaling supports the idea of different roles of amplitude and phase fluctuations in cortical functioning.

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.03.002

M3 - Review

C2 - 29526743

VL - 180

SP - 442

EP - 447

JO - NeuroImage

JF - NeuroImage

SN - 1053-8119

ER -