Distinct criticality of phase and amplitude dynamics in the resting brain

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

  • Andreas Daffertshofer, Institute for Brain and Behavior Amsterdam & Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.daffertshofer@vu.nl.
  • ,
  • Robert Ton, Institute for Brain and Behavior Amsterdam & Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Center for Brain and Cognition, Computational Neuroscience Group, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Carrer Tanger 122-140, 08018, Barcelona, Spain.
  • ,
  • Morten L Kringelbach
  • Mark Woolrich, Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
  • ,
  • Gustavo Deco, Center for Brain and Cognition, Computational Neuroscience Group, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Carrer Tanger 122-140, 08018, Barcelona, Spain; Institució Catalana de la Recerca i Estudis Avanats (ICREA), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Carrer Tanger 122-140, 08018, Barcelona, Spain.

Converging research suggests that the resting brain operates at the cusp of dynamic instability, as signified by scale-free temporal correlations. We asked whether the scaling properties of these correlations differ between amplitude and phase fluctuations, which may reflect different aspects of cortical functioning. Using source-reconstructed magneto-encephalographic signals, we found power-law scaling for the collective amplitude and for phase synchronization, both capturing whole-brain activity. The temporal changes of the amplitude comprise slow, persistent memory processes, whereas phase synchronization exhibits less temporally structured and more complex correlations, indicating a fast and flexible coding. This distinct temporal scaling supports the idea of different roles of amplitude and phase fluctuations in cortical functioning.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeuroImage
Volume180
Pages (from-to)442-447
ISSN1053-8119
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2018

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 129872270