Decoupling Molybdenum Disulfide from Its Substrate by Cesium Intercalation

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DOI

  • Roberto Sant, Universite Grenoble Alpes, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility
  • ,
  • Simone Lisi, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Van Dung Nguyen, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Estelle Mazaleyrat, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Ana Cristina Gómez Herrero, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Olivier Geaymond, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Valérie Guisset, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Philippe David, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Alain Marty, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Matthieu Jamet, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Claude Chapelier, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Laurence Magaud, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Yannick J. Dappe, Universite Paris-Saclay
  • ,
  • Marco Bianchi
  • Philip Hofmann
  • Gilles Renaud, Universite Grenoble Alpes
  • ,
  • Johann Coraux, Universite Grenoble Alpes

Intercalation of alkali atoms within the lamellar transition metal dichalcogenides is a possible route toward a new generation of batteries. It is also a way to induce structural phase transitions authorizing the realization of optical and electrical switches in this class of materials. The process of intercalation has been mostly studied in three-dimensional dichalcogenide films. Here, we address the case of a single-layer of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), deposited on a gold substrate, and intercalated with cesium (Cs) in ultraclean conditions (ultrahigh vacuum). We show that intercalation decouples MoS2 from its substrate. We reveal electron transfer from Cs to MoS2, relative changes in the energy of the valence band maxima, and electronic disorder induced by structural disorder in the intercalated Cs layer. Besides, we find an abnormal lattice expansion of MoS2, which we relate to immediate vicinity of Cs. Intercalation is thermally activated, and so is the reverse process of deintercalation. Our work opens the route to a microscopic understanding of a process of relevance in several possible future technologies, and shows a way to manipulate the properties of two-dimensional dichalcogenides by "under-cover"functionalization.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry C
Volume124
Issue23
Pages (from-to)12397-12408
Number of pages12
ISSN1932-7447
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2020

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