Conservation science and contemporary art: thinking about Tenerife

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Conservation science and contemporary art : thinking about Tenerife. / A’Bear, Luke; Hayward, James Curtis; Root-Bernstein, Meredith.

In: Leonardo, Vol. 50, No. 1, 2017, p. 27-30.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

A’Bear, L, Hayward, JC & Root-Bernstein, M 2017, 'Conservation science and contemporary art: thinking about Tenerife', Leonardo, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 27-30. https://doi.org/10.1162/LEON_a_01153

APA

A’Bear, L., Hayward, J. C., & Root-Bernstein, M. (2017). Conservation science and contemporary art: thinking about Tenerife. Leonardo, 50(1), 27-30. https://doi.org/10.1162/LEON_a_01153

CBE

A’Bear L, Hayward JC, Root-Bernstein M. 2017. Conservation science and contemporary art: thinking about Tenerife. Leonardo. 50(1):27-30. https://doi.org/10.1162/LEON_a_01153

MLA

A’Bear, Luke, James Curtis Hayward and Meredith Root-Bernstein. "Conservation science and contemporary art: thinking about Tenerife". Leonardo. 2017, 50(1). 27-30. https://doi.org/10.1162/LEON_a_01153

Vancouver

A’Bear L, Hayward JC, Root-Bernstein M. Conservation science and contemporary art: thinking about Tenerife. Leonardo. 2017;50(1):27-30. https://doi.org/10.1162/LEON_a_01153

Author

A’Bear, Luke ; Hayward, James Curtis ; Root-Bernstein, Meredith. / Conservation science and contemporary art : thinking about Tenerife. In: Leonardo. 2017 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 27-30.

Bibtex

@article{29400b7cc2d447cfa57573e07316e2ca,
title = "Conservation science and contemporary art: thinking about Tenerife",
abstract = "Art has long been seen as a way to illustrate conservation science for public outreach, especially to children. However, art has a greater role to play as a partner in interdisciplinary practice. Here we explore four examples where early-career conservationists have used the production of artwork inspired by contemporary art movements to engage critically and emotionally through the formalisms of art with conservation issues on the island of Tenerife. The authors suggest that the production of art by conservationists and as conservation (and vice versa) is key to learning to translate between art and science, leading to broader interdisciplinarity.",
author = "Luke A{\textquoteright}Bear and Hayward, {James Curtis} and Meredith Root-Bernstein",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1162/LEON_a_01153",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "27--30",
journal = "Leonardo",
issn = "0024-094X",
publisher = "The MIT Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Conservation science and contemporary art

T2 - thinking about Tenerife

AU - A’Bear, Luke

AU - Hayward, James Curtis

AU - Root-Bernstein, Meredith

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Art has long been seen as a way to illustrate conservation science for public outreach, especially to children. However, art has a greater role to play as a partner in interdisciplinary practice. Here we explore four examples where early-career conservationists have used the production of artwork inspired by contemporary art movements to engage critically and emotionally through the formalisms of art with conservation issues on the island of Tenerife. The authors suggest that the production of art by conservationists and as conservation (and vice versa) is key to learning to translate between art and science, leading to broader interdisciplinarity.

AB - Art has long been seen as a way to illustrate conservation science for public outreach, especially to children. However, art has a greater role to play as a partner in interdisciplinary practice. Here we explore four examples where early-career conservationists have used the production of artwork inspired by contemporary art movements to engage critically and emotionally through the formalisms of art with conservation issues on the island of Tenerife. The authors suggest that the production of art by conservationists and as conservation (and vice versa) is key to learning to translate between art and science, leading to broader interdisciplinarity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85012025921&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1162/LEON_a_01153

DO - 10.1162/LEON_a_01153

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85012025921

VL - 50

SP - 27

EP - 30

JO - Leonardo

JF - Leonardo

SN - 0024-094X

IS - 1

ER -