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Computational thinking in compulsory education: a survey study on initiatives and conceptions

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Computational thinking in compulsory education : a survey study on initiatives and conceptions. / Caeli, Elisa Nadire; Bundsgaard, Jeppe.

In: Educational Technology Research and Development, Vol. 68, No. 1, 2020, p. 551-573.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Caeli, Elisa Nadire ; Bundsgaard, Jeppe. / Computational thinking in compulsory education : a survey study on initiatives and conceptions. In: Educational Technology Research and Development. 2020 ; Vol. 68, No. 1. pp. 551-573.

Bibtex

@article{e68c57ee1acc4c6581e6e732b0ea07ff,
title = "Computational thinking in compulsory education: a survey study on initiatives and conceptions",
abstract = "This article communicates the results of a Danish survey study conducted in 2018 that aimed to examine initiatives relating to computational thinking in primary and lower-secondary schools, as well as the professional development of teachers and the perceptions of school principals in this area. The context is an increasing interest in this field, motivated by a sense that it is important for children to learn computational thinking skills. However, educators struggle with questions regarding what computational thinking in education actually is—and consequently, how they should teach and assess it. In this survey, we wanted to explore existing practices and current situations to find out what school principals regard as important; thus, we designed an electronic questionnaire on this topic. 98 principals started the survey, and 83 completed it. Our analysis suggests that many initiatives connected to computational thinking are currently being implemented, but according to the principals taking part, teachers are not trained to teach this subject. The principals have inclusive views and focus on broad aspects of what computational thinking involves. According to them, computational thinking is not about pushing students into computing careers; rather it is about supporting the well-rounded development of human beings in a free and democratic society. However, the principals do report limited understanding of this subject, which suggests that teachers are not the only ones in need of training—principals also need help to develop a culture and mindset around this subject and implement it efficiently into schools.",
keywords = "Computational thinking, Technological understanding, Computing curriculum, Compulsory education, Computational thinking, Technological understanding, Computing curriculum, Compulsory education",
author = "Caeli, {Elisa Nadire} and Jeppe Bundsgaard",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1007/s11423-019-09694-z",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "551--573",
journal = "Educational Technology Research and Development",
issn = "1042-1629",
publisher = "Springer Link",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Computational thinking in compulsory education

T2 - a survey study on initiatives and conceptions

AU - Caeli, Elisa Nadire

AU - Bundsgaard, Jeppe

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - This article communicates the results of a Danish survey study conducted in 2018 that aimed to examine initiatives relating to computational thinking in primary and lower-secondary schools, as well as the professional development of teachers and the perceptions of school principals in this area. The context is an increasing interest in this field, motivated by a sense that it is important for children to learn computational thinking skills. However, educators struggle with questions regarding what computational thinking in education actually is—and consequently, how they should teach and assess it. In this survey, we wanted to explore existing practices and current situations to find out what school principals regard as important; thus, we designed an electronic questionnaire on this topic. 98 principals started the survey, and 83 completed it. Our analysis suggests that many initiatives connected to computational thinking are currently being implemented, but according to the principals taking part, teachers are not trained to teach this subject. The principals have inclusive views and focus on broad aspects of what computational thinking involves. According to them, computational thinking is not about pushing students into computing careers; rather it is about supporting the well-rounded development of human beings in a free and democratic society. However, the principals do report limited understanding of this subject, which suggests that teachers are not the only ones in need of training—principals also need help to develop a culture and mindset around this subject and implement it efficiently into schools.

AB - This article communicates the results of a Danish survey study conducted in 2018 that aimed to examine initiatives relating to computational thinking in primary and lower-secondary schools, as well as the professional development of teachers and the perceptions of school principals in this area. The context is an increasing interest in this field, motivated by a sense that it is important for children to learn computational thinking skills. However, educators struggle with questions regarding what computational thinking in education actually is—and consequently, how they should teach and assess it. In this survey, we wanted to explore existing practices and current situations to find out what school principals regard as important; thus, we designed an electronic questionnaire on this topic. 98 principals started the survey, and 83 completed it. Our analysis suggests that many initiatives connected to computational thinking are currently being implemented, but according to the principals taking part, teachers are not trained to teach this subject. The principals have inclusive views and focus on broad aspects of what computational thinking involves. According to them, computational thinking is not about pushing students into computing careers; rather it is about supporting the well-rounded development of human beings in a free and democratic society. However, the principals do report limited understanding of this subject, which suggests that teachers are not the only ones in need of training—principals also need help to develop a culture and mindset around this subject and implement it efficiently into schools.

KW - Computational thinking

KW - Technological understanding

KW - Computing curriculum

KW - Compulsory education

KW - Computational thinking

KW - Technological understanding

KW - Computing curriculum

KW - Compulsory education

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069739751&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11423-019-09694-z

DO - 10.1007/s11423-019-09694-z

M3 - Journal article

VL - 68

SP - 551

EP - 573

JO - Educational Technology Research and Development

JF - Educational Technology Research and Development

SN - 1042-1629

IS - 1

ER -