Department of Political Science

Command and motivation: How the perception of external interventions relates to intrinsic motivation and public service motivation

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Motivated employees are crucial to organizations, but external interventions such as command systems and financial incentives may decrease motivation. If these external interventions are perceived to be controlling, they are expected to crowd out intrinsic motivation, and this may also apply to other types of autonomous motivation such as public service motivation. The perception of external interventions is thus expected to be vital. This article investigates how the perception of a specific command system (obligatory student plans) is associated with intrinsic motivation and public service motivation. Using a dataset with 3,230 school teachers in Denmark, a structural equation model shows that the perception of obligatory student plans as controlling is negatively associated with all of the investigated types of employee motivation, supporting that motivation crowding can occur.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPublic Administration
Volume92
Issue4
Pages (from-to)790–806
Number of pages17
ISSN0033-3298
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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