Combined N-glycome and N-glycoproteome analysis of the Lotus japonicus seed globulin fraction shows conservation of protein structure and glycosylation in legumes

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  • Svend Secher Dam, Denmark
  • Morten Thaysen-Andersen, Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Australia
  • Eva Stenkjær, Denmark
  • Andrea Maria Lorentzen, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
  • Peter Roepstorff, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
  • Nicolle H Packer, Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Australia
  • Jens Stougaard
Legume food allergy, such as allergy toward peanuts and soybeans, is a health issue predicted to worsen as dietary advice recommends higher intake of legume-based foods. Lotus japonicus (Lotus) is an established legume plant model system for studies of symbiotic and pathogenic microbial interactions and, due to its well characterized genotype/phenotype and easily manipulated genome, may also be suitable for studies of legume food allergy. Here we present a comprehensive study of the Lotus N-glycoproteome. The global and site-specific N-glycan structures of Lotus seed globulins were analyzed using mass spectrometry-based glycomics and glycoproteomics techniques. In total, 19 N-glycan structures comprising high mannose (∼20%), pauci-mannosidic (∼40%), and complex forms (∼40%) were determined. The pauci-mannosidic and complex N-glycans contained high amounts of the typical plant determinants β-1,2-xylose and α-1,3-fucose. Two abundant Lotus seed N-glycoproteins were site-specifically profiled; a predicted lectin containing two fully occupied N-glycosylation sites carried predominantly pauci-mannosidic structures in different distributions. In contrast, Lotus convicilin storage protein 2 (LCP2) carried exclusively high mannose N-glycans similar to its homologue, Ara h 1, which is the major allergen in peanut. In silico investigation confirmed that peanut Ara h 1 and Lotus LCP2 are highly similar at the primary and higher protein structure levels. Hence, we suggest that Lotus has the potential to serve as a model system for studying the role of seed proteins and their glycosylation in food allergy.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Proteome Research
Volume12
Issue7
Pages (from-to)3383-3392
Number of pages10
ISSN1535-3893
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jul 2013

Bibliographical note

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

    Research areas

  • Ara h 1, food allergy, globulin, glycomics, glycoproteomics, Lotus japonicus, N-glycosylation, peanut

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