Cognitive training for children with ADHD: composite cognitive score outcome in a randomized controlled trial

Aida Bikic*, Søren Dalsgaard, Brian Pittman, James Frederick Leckman, Bruce Wexler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE OF THE ARTICLE: Cognitive training for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has shown promising, although mixed results. In post-hoc analyses, we evaluate effects of cognitive training using a novel composite cognition score as the outcome for children attending at least 16 sessions of training, dose-response of training and associations between symptoms and cognitive functioning.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Children (age 6-13) with ADHD were randomized to intervention (n = 26) or control (n = 34). For the current analysis, we restricted the intervention group to children, who completed at least 16 sessions of cognitive training (n = 26) and examined a dose response within that group.

RESULTS: Cognition improved significantly in the intervention, but not control group. Amount of the completed training sessions correlated significantly with the amount of cognitive improvement.

CONCLUSION: Variations in dose and frequency of training may be an important source of the variance in previous studies.

Original languageEnglish
Book seriesNordic Journal of Psychiatry
Volume78
Issue1
Pages (from-to)87-91
Number of pages5
ISSN0803-9496
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

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