Cognitive control in auditory working memory is enhanced in musicians

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Karen Johanne Pallesen, Univ Helsinki, University of Helsinki, Inst Biomed Physiol, Neurosci Unit, Aarhus Univ, Aarhus University, Ctr Funct Integrat Neurosci, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus University, Pathophysiol & Expt Tomog Ctr
  • ,
  • Elvira Brattico
  • Christopher J. Bailey
  • Antti Korvenoja, Univ Helsinki, Helsinki University Central Hospital, University of Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Med Imaging Ctr
  • ,
  • Juha Koivisto, Univ Helsinki, University of Helsinki, Inst Biomed Physiol, Neurosci Unit
  • ,
  • Albert Gjedde, Aarhus Univ, Aarhus University, Ctr Funct Integrat Neurosci, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus University, Pathophysiol & Expt Tomog Ctr
  • ,
  • Synnove Carlson, Helsinki Univ Technol, Aalto University, Low Temp Lab, Brain Res Unit

Musical competence may confer cognitive advantages that extend beyond processing of familiar musical sounds. Behavioural evidence indicates a general enhancement of both working memory and attention in musicians. It is possible that musicians, due to their training, are better able to maintain focus on task-relevant stimuli, a skill which is crucial to working memory. We measured the blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) activation signal in musicians and non-musicians during working memory of musical sounds to determine the relation among performance, musical competence and generally enhanced cognition. All participants easily distinguished the stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that musicians nonetheless would perform better, and that differential brain activity would mainly be present in cortical areas involved in cognitive control such as the lateral prefrontal cortex. The musicians performed better as reflected in reaction times and error rates. Musicians also had larger BOLD responses than non-musicians in neuronal networks that sustain attention and cognitive control, including regions of the lateral prefrontal cortex, lateral parietal cortex, insula, and putamen in the right hemisphere, and bilaterally in the posterior dorsal prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus. The relationship between the task performance and the magnitude of the BOLD response was more positive in musicians than in non-musicians, particularly during the most difficult working memory task. The results confirm previous findings that neural activity increases during enhanced working memory performance. The results also suggest that superior working memory task performance in musicians rely on an enhanced ability to exert sustained cognitive control. This cognitive benefit in musicians may be a consequence of focused musical training.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11120
JournalP L o S One
Volume5
Issue6
Number of pages12
ISSN1932-6203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2010

    Research areas

  • ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX, GENERAL FLUID INTELLIGENCE, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, BRAIN ACTIVATION, NEURAL MECHANISMS, PITCH PERCEPTION, BROCAS AREA, NONMUSICIANS, TASK

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 90814487