Classification of Thyroid Dysfunction in Pregnant Women Differs by Analytical Method and Type of Thyroid Function Test

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  • Stine Linding Andersen
  • Peter Astrup Christensen, Aalborg Universitetshospital, Klinisk Biokemisk Afdeling, Klinisk Institut, Aalborg Universitet
  • ,
  • Louise Knøsgaard, Aalborg Universitetshospital, Klinisk Biokemisk Afdeling, Klinisk Institut, Aalborg Universitet
  • ,
  • Stig Andersen, Aalborg University
  • ,
  • Aase Handberg, Aalborg Universitetshospital, Klinisk Biokemisk Afdeling, Klinisk Institut, Aalborg Universitet
  • ,
  • Annebirthe Bo Hansen, Aalborg Universitetshospital, Klinisk Biokemisk Afdeling
  • ,
  • Peter Vestergaard

CONTEXT: Physiological alterations challenge the assessment of maternal thyroid function in pregnancy. It remains uncertain how the reference ranges vary by week of pregnancy, and how the classification of disease varies by analytical method and type of thyroid function test.

DESIGN: Serum samples from Danish pregnant women (n = 6282) were used for the measurement of thyrotropin (TSH), total and free thyroxine (T4), total and free 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), and T-uptake using "Method A" (Cobas 8000, Roche Diagnostics). TSH and free T4 were also measured using "Method B" (ADVIA Centaur XP, Siemens Healthineers).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pregnancy week- and method-specific reference ranges were established among thyroid antibody-negative women (n = 4612). The reference ranges were used to classify maternal thyroid function, and results were compared by analytical method and type of thyroid function test.

RESULTS: The reference ranges for TSH showed a gradual decrease during pregnancy weeks 4 to 14, a gradual increase was observed for total T4, total T3, and T-uptake, whereas free T4 and free T3 showed less variation. When TSH and free T4 were used, Method A classified 935 (14.9%) with abnormal thyroid function, Method B a total of 903 (14.4%), and the methods agreed on 554 individuals. When TSH and total T4 were used, 947 (15.1%) were classified with abnormal thyroid function, and classifications by either total T4 or free T4 agreed on 584 individuals.

CONCLUSIONS: Even when pregnancy week- and method-specific reference ranges were established, the classification of maternal thyroid dysfunction varied considerably by analytical method and type of thyroid function test.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberdgaa567
JournalThe Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
Volume105
Issue11
Number of pages11
ISSN0021-972X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2020

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 200573169