Department of Political Science

Citizens’ Motivated Reasoning about Public Performance: Experimental Findings from the US and Denmark

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Citizens’ Motivated Reasoning about Public Performance : Experimental Findings from the US and Denmark. / Bækgaard, Martin; James, Oliver; Serritzlew, Søren et al.

In: International Public Management Journal, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2020, p. 186-204.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Bækgaard M, James O, Serritzlew S, Van Ryzin GG. Citizens’ Motivated Reasoning about Public Performance: Experimental Findings from the US and Denmark. International Public Management Journal. 2020;23(2):186-204. Epub 2019. doi: 10.1080/10967494.2019.1659891

Author

Bækgaard, Martin ; James, Oliver ; Serritzlew, Søren et al. / Citizens’ Motivated Reasoning about Public Performance : Experimental Findings from the US and Denmark. In: International Public Management Journal. 2020 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 186-204.

Bibtex

@article{65d734165a0c46d6a7e13bfc75d00635,
title = "Citizens{\textquoteright} Motivated Reasoning about Public Performance: Experimental Findings from the US and Denmark",
abstract = "ABSTRACT: Recent studies find motivated reasoning in citizens{\textquoteright} processing of information about public performance. Using experiments in the US and Denmark, we examine effects on an accuracy-based task of two forms of motivated reasoning: partisan identity-based reasoning and reasoning from ideology-based governance preferences (favoring either the public or the private sector). The experiments incorporate a political prime, a health care needs prime (to reduce politicization), and a neutral, no-prime, condition. We find that priming citizens to think politically accentuates the influence of partisan identities and governance preferences on reasoning. In contrast, priming about the need for a service reduces these biases. These findings extend knowledge of motivated reasoning in an accuracy-based task and priming with a no-prime benchmark, and confirm some findings of previous studies. Reducing the salience of partisan identities or governance preferences in the presentation of information may help stimulate more accuracy-based reasoning about public performance.",
author = "Martin B{\ae}kgaard and Oliver James and S{\o}ren Serritzlew and {Van Ryzin}, {Gregg G.}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1080/10967494.2019.1659891",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "186--204",
journal = "International Public Management Journal",
issn = "1096-7494",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Citizens’ Motivated Reasoning about Public Performance

T2 - Experimental Findings from the US and Denmark

AU - Bækgaard, Martin

AU - James, Oliver

AU - Serritzlew, Søren

AU - Van Ryzin, Gregg G.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - ABSTRACT: Recent studies find motivated reasoning in citizens’ processing of information about public performance. Using experiments in the US and Denmark, we examine effects on an accuracy-based task of two forms of motivated reasoning: partisan identity-based reasoning and reasoning from ideology-based governance preferences (favoring either the public or the private sector). The experiments incorporate a political prime, a health care needs prime (to reduce politicization), and a neutral, no-prime, condition. We find that priming citizens to think politically accentuates the influence of partisan identities and governance preferences on reasoning. In contrast, priming about the need for a service reduces these biases. These findings extend knowledge of motivated reasoning in an accuracy-based task and priming with a no-prime benchmark, and confirm some findings of previous studies. Reducing the salience of partisan identities or governance preferences in the presentation of information may help stimulate more accuracy-based reasoning about public performance.

AB - ABSTRACT: Recent studies find motivated reasoning in citizens’ processing of information about public performance. Using experiments in the US and Denmark, we examine effects on an accuracy-based task of two forms of motivated reasoning: partisan identity-based reasoning and reasoning from ideology-based governance preferences (favoring either the public or the private sector). The experiments incorporate a political prime, a health care needs prime (to reduce politicization), and a neutral, no-prime, condition. We find that priming citizens to think politically accentuates the influence of partisan identities and governance preferences on reasoning. In contrast, priming about the need for a service reduces these biases. These findings extend knowledge of motivated reasoning in an accuracy-based task and priming with a no-prime benchmark, and confirm some findings of previous studies. Reducing the salience of partisan identities or governance preferences in the presentation of information may help stimulate more accuracy-based reasoning about public performance.

U2 - 10.1080/10967494.2019.1659891

DO - 10.1080/10967494.2019.1659891

M3 - Journal article

VL - 23

SP - 186

EP - 204

JO - International Public Management Journal

JF - International Public Management Journal

SN - 1096-7494

IS - 2

ER -