Department of Economics and Business Economics

Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness: With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness : With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study. / Ranning, Anne; Munk Laursen, Thomas; Thorup, Anne; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete.

In: American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal, Vol. 55, No. 11, 11.2016, p. 953-961.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Ranning, A, Munk Laursen, T, Thorup, A, Hjorthøj, C & Nordentoft, M 2016, 'Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness: With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study', American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal, vol. 55, no. 11, pp. 953-961. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.776

APA

Ranning, A., Munk Laursen, T., Thorup, A., Hjorthøj, C., & Nordentoft, M. (2016). Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness: With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal, 55(11), 953-961. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.776

CBE

Ranning A, Munk Laursen T, Thorup A, Hjorthøj C, Nordentoft M. 2016. Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness: With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal. 55(11):953-961. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.776

MLA

Ranning, Anne et al. "Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness: With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study". American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal. 2016, 55(11). 953-961. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.776

Vancouver

Ranning A, Munk Laursen T, Thorup A, Hjorthøj C, Nordentoft M. Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness: With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study. American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal. 2016 Nov;55(11):953-961. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.776

Author

Ranning, Anne ; Munk Laursen, Thomas ; Thorup, Anne ; Hjorthøj, Carsten ; Nordentoft, Merete. / Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness : With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study. In: American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 55, No. 11. pp. 953-961.

Bibtex

@article{e57ea096b70644f5a9f65faf3d54745e,
title = "Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness: With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of living arrangements during childhood for children of parents with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.METHOD: Information was obtained from Danish registers on children's addresses and used to calculate the proportion living in different household living arrangements. The study was conducted as a prospective, register-based cohort study covering all children in the entire Danish population born after 1982 (N = 1,823,625) and their parents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, or none of these disorders. Regression analyses were performed assessing the risk of dissolution of the conjugal family.RESULTS: Children's living arrangements were characterized by fewer nuclear families and more single-parent-headed households when parents had serious mental illness (SMI). From birth, 15% to 20% of children lived with a single mother with SMI. Conjugal families were dissolved at higher rates if a parent had SMI, especially if the mother (incidence rate ratio 2.98; 95% CI 2.80-3.17) or the father (incidence rate ratio 2.60; 95% CI 2.47-2.74) had schizophrenia. Risks for family dissolution varied greatly with parents' socioeconomic position in all diagnostic groups.CONCLUSION: Parents' SMI affects children's family living arrangements because fewer children live with both parents and more children live with a single parent or are separated from both parents. Family cohesion seems especially difficult to maintain when parents have schizophrenia.",
author = "Anne Ranning and {Munk Laursen}, Thomas and Anne Thorup and Carsten Hjorth{\o}j and Merete Nordentoft",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2016",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.776",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "953--961",
journal = "American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal",
issn = "0890-8567",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness

T2 - With Whom Do They Grow Up? A Prospective, Population-Based Study

AU - Ranning, Anne

AU - Munk Laursen, Thomas

AU - Thorup, Anne

AU - Hjorthøj, Carsten

AU - Nordentoft, Merete

N1 - Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of living arrangements during childhood for children of parents with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.METHOD: Information was obtained from Danish registers on children's addresses and used to calculate the proportion living in different household living arrangements. The study was conducted as a prospective, register-based cohort study covering all children in the entire Danish population born after 1982 (N = 1,823,625) and their parents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, or none of these disorders. Regression analyses were performed assessing the risk of dissolution of the conjugal family.RESULTS: Children's living arrangements were characterized by fewer nuclear families and more single-parent-headed households when parents had serious mental illness (SMI). From birth, 15% to 20% of children lived with a single mother with SMI. Conjugal families were dissolved at higher rates if a parent had SMI, especially if the mother (incidence rate ratio 2.98; 95% CI 2.80-3.17) or the father (incidence rate ratio 2.60; 95% CI 2.47-2.74) had schizophrenia. Risks for family dissolution varied greatly with parents' socioeconomic position in all diagnostic groups.CONCLUSION: Parents' SMI affects children's family living arrangements because fewer children live with both parents and more children live with a single parent or are separated from both parents. Family cohesion seems especially difficult to maintain when parents have schizophrenia.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of living arrangements during childhood for children of parents with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.METHOD: Information was obtained from Danish registers on children's addresses and used to calculate the proportion living in different household living arrangements. The study was conducted as a prospective, register-based cohort study covering all children in the entire Danish population born after 1982 (N = 1,823,625) and their parents with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, or none of these disorders. Regression analyses were performed assessing the risk of dissolution of the conjugal family.RESULTS: Children's living arrangements were characterized by fewer nuclear families and more single-parent-headed households when parents had serious mental illness (SMI). From birth, 15% to 20% of children lived with a single mother with SMI. Conjugal families were dissolved at higher rates if a parent had SMI, especially if the mother (incidence rate ratio 2.98; 95% CI 2.80-3.17) or the father (incidence rate ratio 2.60; 95% CI 2.47-2.74) had schizophrenia. Risks for family dissolution varied greatly with parents' socioeconomic position in all diagnostic groups.CONCLUSION: Parents' SMI affects children's family living arrangements because fewer children live with both parents and more children live with a single parent or are separated from both parents. Family cohesion seems especially difficult to maintain when parents have schizophrenia.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.776

DO - 10.1016/j.jaac.2016.07.776

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27806863

VL - 55

SP - 953

EP - 961

JO - American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal

JF - American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Journal

SN - 0890-8567

IS - 11

ER -