Department of Economics and Business Economics

Childhood exposure to green space - A novel risk-decreasing mechanism for schizophrenia?

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Childhood exposure to green space - A novel risk-decreasing mechanism for schizophrenia? / Engemann, Kristine; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Arge, Lars et al.

In: Schizophrenia Research, Vol. 199, 2018, p. 142-148.

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@article{9aa9fc7efa424e02b31af17e16b8244c,
title = "Childhood exposure to green space - A novel risk-decreasing mechanism for schizophrenia?",
abstract = "Schizophrenia risk has been linked to urbanization, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Green space is hypothesized to positively influence mental health and might mediate risk of schizophrenia by mitigating noise and particle pollution exposure, stress relief, or other unknown mechanisms. The objectives for this study were to determine if green space are associated with schizophrenia risk, and if different measures of green space associate differently with risk. We used satellite data from the Landsat program to quantify green space in a new data set for Denmark at 30×30m resolution for the years 1985-2013. The effect of green space at different ages and within different distances from each person's place of residence on schizophrenia risk was estimated using Cox regression on a very large longitudinal population-based sample of the Danish population (943,027 persons). Living at the lowest amount of green space was associated with a 1.52-fold increased risk of developing schizophrenia compared to persons living at the highest level of green space. This association remained after adjusting for known risk factors for schizophrenia: urbanization, age, sex, and socioeconomic status. The strongest protective association was observed during the earliest childhood years and closest to place of residence. This is the first nationwide population-based study to demonstrate a protective association between green space during childhood and schizophrenia risk; suggesting limited green space as a novel environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. This study supports findings from other studies highlighting positive effects of exposure to natural environments for human health.",
keywords = "Age Factors, Child, Child, Preschool, Denmark/epidemiology, Environment, Female, Geography, Medical, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Prospective Studies, Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Rural Population, Satellite Imagery, Schizophrenia/epidemiology, Urban Population, Urbanization",
author = "Kristine Engemann and Pedersen, {Carsten B{\o}cker} and Lars Arge and Constantinos Tsirogiannis and Mortensen, {Preben Bo} and Jens-Christian Svenning",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.schres.2018.03.026",
language = "English",
volume = "199",
pages = "142--148",
journal = "Schizophrenia Research",
issn = "0920-9964",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Childhood exposure to green space - A novel risk-decreasing mechanism for schizophrenia?

AU - Engemann, Kristine

AU - Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker

AU - Arge, Lars

AU - Tsirogiannis, Constantinos

AU - Mortensen, Preben Bo

AU - Svenning, Jens-Christian

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Schizophrenia risk has been linked to urbanization, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Green space is hypothesized to positively influence mental health and might mediate risk of schizophrenia by mitigating noise and particle pollution exposure, stress relief, or other unknown mechanisms. The objectives for this study were to determine if green space are associated with schizophrenia risk, and if different measures of green space associate differently with risk. We used satellite data from the Landsat program to quantify green space in a new data set for Denmark at 30×30m resolution for the years 1985-2013. The effect of green space at different ages and within different distances from each person's place of residence on schizophrenia risk was estimated using Cox regression on a very large longitudinal population-based sample of the Danish population (943,027 persons). Living at the lowest amount of green space was associated with a 1.52-fold increased risk of developing schizophrenia compared to persons living at the highest level of green space. This association remained after adjusting for known risk factors for schizophrenia: urbanization, age, sex, and socioeconomic status. The strongest protective association was observed during the earliest childhood years and closest to place of residence. This is the first nationwide population-based study to demonstrate a protective association between green space during childhood and schizophrenia risk; suggesting limited green space as a novel environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. This study supports findings from other studies highlighting positive effects of exposure to natural environments for human health.

AB - Schizophrenia risk has been linked to urbanization, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Green space is hypothesized to positively influence mental health and might mediate risk of schizophrenia by mitigating noise and particle pollution exposure, stress relief, or other unknown mechanisms. The objectives for this study were to determine if green space are associated with schizophrenia risk, and if different measures of green space associate differently with risk. We used satellite data from the Landsat program to quantify green space in a new data set for Denmark at 30×30m resolution for the years 1985-2013. The effect of green space at different ages and within different distances from each person's place of residence on schizophrenia risk was estimated using Cox regression on a very large longitudinal population-based sample of the Danish population (943,027 persons). Living at the lowest amount of green space was associated with a 1.52-fold increased risk of developing schizophrenia compared to persons living at the highest level of green space. This association remained after adjusting for known risk factors for schizophrenia: urbanization, age, sex, and socioeconomic status. The strongest protective association was observed during the earliest childhood years and closest to place of residence. This is the first nationwide population-based study to demonstrate a protective association between green space during childhood and schizophrenia risk; suggesting limited green space as a novel environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. This study supports findings from other studies highlighting positive effects of exposure to natural environments for human health.

KW - Age Factors

KW - Child

KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Environment

KW - Female

KW - Geography, Medical

KW - Humans

KW - Incidence

KW - Infant

KW - Infant, Newborn

KW - Longitudinal Studies

KW - Male

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology

KW - Residence Characteristics

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Rural Population

KW - Satellite Imagery

KW - Schizophrenia/epidemiology

KW - Urban Population

KW - Urbanization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044280102&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.schres.2018.03.026

DO - 10.1016/j.schres.2018.03.026

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29573946

VL - 199

SP - 142

EP - 148

JO - Schizophrenia Research

JF - Schizophrenia Research

SN - 0920-9964

ER -