Characterizing phosphorus availability in waste products by chemical extractions and plant uptake

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Characterizing phosphorus availability in waste products by chemical extractions and plant uptake. / Christiansen, Nina Høj; Sørensen, Peter; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Christensen, Bent T.; Rubæk, Gitte Holton.

In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Vol. 183, No. 4, 2020, p. 416-428.

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Christiansen, Nina Høj et al. "Characterizing phosphorus availability in waste products by chemical extractions and plant uptake". Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science. 2020, 183(4). 416-428. https://doi.org/10.1002/jpln.202000015

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@article{82c98e4fafa84cfea10b581dd91a6761,
title = "Characterizing phosphorus availability in waste products by chemical extractions and plant uptake",
abstract = "Background: The fertilizer value of phosphorus (P) in waste products relies heavily on its availability to the subsequent crop. Aim: We studied the link between extractable P in waste products and apparent P recovery (APR, i.e., difference in plant P uptake between P amended and un-amended soils divided by the amount of P added) using spring barley grown on three sandy soils. Methods: The products included sewage sludge, biomass ash, struvite, compost, meat and bone meal, biochar from sewage sludge, and industrial sludge. Soft rock phosphate and triple-superphosphate (TSP) were included for comparison. Availability of P was characterized by extraction with water and solutions of sodium bicarbonate, citric acid, oxalic acid, hydrochloric acid, ammonium acetate, ammonium fluoride and anion exchange resin membranes. TSP was used to establish mineral-fertilizer-equivalents (MFE). Water and bicarbonate extractions were also applied to products incubated with soil before extraction. Results: The APR ranged 26 to 31% for TSP and 0 to 30% for waste products. APR correlated most strongly with bicarbonate extractable P. The correlation increased when products were incubated with soil before extraction. Conclusions: We conclude that bicarbonate extraction is a good indicator of potential P availability. However, interactions between waste products and soil properties modify P availability.",
keywords = "bioavailability, extraction methods, plant uptake, pot experiment, recycling",
author = "Christiansen, {Nina H{\o}j} and Peter S{\o}rensen and Rodrigo Labouriau and Christensen, {Bent T.} and Rub{\ae}k, {Gitte Holton}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1002/jpln.202000015",
language = "English",
volume = "183",
pages = "416--428",
journal = "Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science",
issn = "1436-8730",
publisher = "Wiley - V C H Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterizing phosphorus availability in waste products by chemical extractions and plant uptake

AU - Christiansen, Nina Høj

AU - Sørensen, Peter

AU - Labouriau, Rodrigo

AU - Christensen, Bent T.

AU - Rubæk, Gitte Holton

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Background: The fertilizer value of phosphorus (P) in waste products relies heavily on its availability to the subsequent crop. Aim: We studied the link between extractable P in waste products and apparent P recovery (APR, i.e., difference in plant P uptake between P amended and un-amended soils divided by the amount of P added) using spring barley grown on three sandy soils. Methods: The products included sewage sludge, biomass ash, struvite, compost, meat and bone meal, biochar from sewage sludge, and industrial sludge. Soft rock phosphate and triple-superphosphate (TSP) were included for comparison. Availability of P was characterized by extraction with water and solutions of sodium bicarbonate, citric acid, oxalic acid, hydrochloric acid, ammonium acetate, ammonium fluoride and anion exchange resin membranes. TSP was used to establish mineral-fertilizer-equivalents (MFE). Water and bicarbonate extractions were also applied to products incubated with soil before extraction. Results: The APR ranged 26 to 31% for TSP and 0 to 30% for waste products. APR correlated most strongly with bicarbonate extractable P. The correlation increased when products were incubated with soil before extraction. Conclusions: We conclude that bicarbonate extraction is a good indicator of potential P availability. However, interactions between waste products and soil properties modify P availability.

AB - Background: The fertilizer value of phosphorus (P) in waste products relies heavily on its availability to the subsequent crop. Aim: We studied the link between extractable P in waste products and apparent P recovery (APR, i.e., difference in plant P uptake between P amended and un-amended soils divided by the amount of P added) using spring barley grown on three sandy soils. Methods: The products included sewage sludge, biomass ash, struvite, compost, meat and bone meal, biochar from sewage sludge, and industrial sludge. Soft rock phosphate and triple-superphosphate (TSP) were included for comparison. Availability of P was characterized by extraction with water and solutions of sodium bicarbonate, citric acid, oxalic acid, hydrochloric acid, ammonium acetate, ammonium fluoride and anion exchange resin membranes. TSP was used to establish mineral-fertilizer-equivalents (MFE). Water and bicarbonate extractions were also applied to products incubated with soil before extraction. Results: The APR ranged 26 to 31% for TSP and 0 to 30% for waste products. APR correlated most strongly with bicarbonate extractable P. The correlation increased when products were incubated with soil before extraction. Conclusions: We conclude that bicarbonate extraction is a good indicator of potential P availability. However, interactions between waste products and soil properties modify P availability.

KW - bioavailability

KW - extraction methods

KW - plant uptake

KW - pot experiment

KW - recycling

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85084581159&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jpln.202000015

DO - 10.1002/jpln.202000015

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85084581159

VL - 183

SP - 416

EP - 428

JO - Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science

JF - Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science

SN - 1436-8730

IS - 4

ER -