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Characterization of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) thin films grafted from functionalized titanium surfaces

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Characterization of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) thin films grafted from functionalized titanium surfaces. / Zorn, Gilad; Baio, Joe E; Weidner, Tobias et al.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 27, No. 21, 11.2011, p. 13104-12.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Zorn G, Baio JE, Weidner T, Migonney V, Castner DG. Characterization of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) thin films grafted from functionalized titanium surfaces. Langmuir. 2011 Nov;27(21):13104-12. doi: 10.1021/la201918y

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Zorn, Gilad ; Baio, Joe E ; Weidner, Tobias et al. / Characterization of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) thin films grafted from functionalized titanium surfaces. In: Langmuir. 2011 ; Vol. 27, No. 21. pp. 13104-12.

Bibtex

@article{49605a9812344019a5cf75fa6e6a1864,
title = "Characterization of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) thin films grafted from functionalized titanium surfaces",
abstract = "Biointegration of titanium implants in the body is controlled by their surface properties. Improving surface properties by coating with a bioactive polymer is a promising approach to improve the biological performance of titanium implants. To optimize the grafting processes, it is important to fully understand the composition and structure of the modified surfaces. The main focus of this study is to provide a detailed, multitechnique characterization of a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film grafted from titanium surfaces via a two-step procedure. Thin titanium films (∼50 nm thick with an average surface roughness of 0.9 ± 0.2 nm) prepared by evaporation onto silicon wafers were used as smooth model substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) showed that the titanium film was covered with a TiO(2) layer that was at least 10 nm thick and contained hydroxyl groups present at the outermost surface. These hydroxyl groups were first modified with a 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) cross-linker. XPS and ToF-SIMS showed that a monolayer of the MPS molecules was successfully attached onto the titanium surfaces. The pNaSS film was grafted from the MPS-modified titanium through atom transfer radical polymerization. Again, XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to verify that the pNaSS molecules were successfully grafted onto the modified surfaces. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed that the film was smooth and uniformly covered the surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that an ordered array of grafted NaSS molecules were present on the titanium surfaces. Sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy illustrated that the NaSS molecules were grafted onto the titanium surface with a substantial degree of orientational order in the styrene rings.",
keywords = "Methacrylates, Polymers, Silanes, Sulfonic Acids, Surface Properties, Titanium, Journal Article, Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.",
author = "Gilad Zorn and Baio, {Joe E} and Tobias Weidner and Veronique Migonney and Castner, {David G}",
year = "2011",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1021/la201918y",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "13104--12",
journal = "Langmuir",
issn = "0743-7463",
publisher = "AMER CHEMICAL SOC",
number = "21",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterization of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) thin films grafted from functionalized titanium surfaces

AU - Zorn, Gilad

AU - Baio, Joe E

AU - Weidner, Tobias

AU - Migonney, Veronique

AU - Castner, David G

PY - 2011/11

Y1 - 2011/11

N2 - Biointegration of titanium implants in the body is controlled by their surface properties. Improving surface properties by coating with a bioactive polymer is a promising approach to improve the biological performance of titanium implants. To optimize the grafting processes, it is important to fully understand the composition and structure of the modified surfaces. The main focus of this study is to provide a detailed, multitechnique characterization of a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film grafted from titanium surfaces via a two-step procedure. Thin titanium films (∼50 nm thick with an average surface roughness of 0.9 ± 0.2 nm) prepared by evaporation onto silicon wafers were used as smooth model substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) showed that the titanium film was covered with a TiO(2) layer that was at least 10 nm thick and contained hydroxyl groups present at the outermost surface. These hydroxyl groups were first modified with a 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) cross-linker. XPS and ToF-SIMS showed that a monolayer of the MPS molecules was successfully attached onto the titanium surfaces. The pNaSS film was grafted from the MPS-modified titanium through atom transfer radical polymerization. Again, XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to verify that the pNaSS molecules were successfully grafted onto the modified surfaces. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed that the film was smooth and uniformly covered the surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that an ordered array of grafted NaSS molecules were present on the titanium surfaces. Sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy illustrated that the NaSS molecules were grafted onto the titanium surface with a substantial degree of orientational order in the styrene rings.

AB - Biointegration of titanium implants in the body is controlled by their surface properties. Improving surface properties by coating with a bioactive polymer is a promising approach to improve the biological performance of titanium implants. To optimize the grafting processes, it is important to fully understand the composition and structure of the modified surfaces. The main focus of this study is to provide a detailed, multitechnique characterization of a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film grafted from titanium surfaces via a two-step procedure. Thin titanium films (∼50 nm thick with an average surface roughness of 0.9 ± 0.2 nm) prepared by evaporation onto silicon wafers were used as smooth model substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) showed that the titanium film was covered with a TiO(2) layer that was at least 10 nm thick and contained hydroxyl groups present at the outermost surface. These hydroxyl groups were first modified with a 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) cross-linker. XPS and ToF-SIMS showed that a monolayer of the MPS molecules was successfully attached onto the titanium surfaces. The pNaSS film was grafted from the MPS-modified titanium through atom transfer radical polymerization. Again, XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to verify that the pNaSS molecules were successfully grafted onto the modified surfaces. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed that the film was smooth and uniformly covered the surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that an ordered array of grafted NaSS molecules were present on the titanium surfaces. Sum frequency generation vibration spectroscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy illustrated that the NaSS molecules were grafted onto the titanium surface with a substantial degree of orientational order in the styrene rings.

KW - Methacrylates

KW - Polymers

KW - Silanes

KW - Sulfonic Acids

KW - Surface Properties

KW - Titanium

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

KW - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

U2 - 10.1021/la201918y

DO - 10.1021/la201918y

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21892821

VL - 27

SP - 13104

EP - 13112

JO - Langmuir

JF - Langmuir

SN - 0743-7463

IS - 21

ER -