Cervical Motor and Nociceptive Dysfunction After an Acute Whiplash Injury and the Association With Long-Term Non-Recovery: Revisiting a One-Year Prospective Cohort With Ankle Injured Controls

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Cervical Motor and Nociceptive Dysfunction After an Acute Whiplash Injury and the Association With Long-Term Non-Recovery : Revisiting a One-Year Prospective Cohort With Ankle Injured Controls. / Kasch, Helge; Carstensen, Tina; Ravn, Sophie Lykkegaard et al.

In: Frontiers in Pain Research, Vol. 3, 906638, 07.2022.

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@article{ceecf18d5fb2452cb70edd393f7ccd31,
title = "Cervical Motor and Nociceptive Dysfunction After an Acute Whiplash Injury and the Association With Long-Term Non-Recovery: Revisiting a One-Year Prospective Cohort With Ankle Injured Controls",
abstract = "AbstractAims: Exploring the development of cervical motor and nociceptive dysfunction and recovery in patients (WPs) 1 year after whiplash injury compared with ankle-injured controls (ACs).Methods: A 1-year observational prospective study examining consecutive WPs, and age- and sex-matched ACs at 1 week and 3, 6, and 12 months post-injury with semi-structured interviews; the McGill Pain Questionnaire; neurological examination, indicators of peripheral, segmental, and central nociceptive dysfunction: cold pressor test (CPT), pressure algometry, and methodic palpation; indicators of cervical motor dysfunction: active cervical range-of-motion (CROM), neck strength (maximal voluntary contraction flexion/extension (MVC). 12-month work disability was determined. Results: A total of 141 WPs and 40 ACs were included. Total pain rating index (PRI-T) and number of words count were higher in ACs initially, however, higher in WPs after 3, 6, and 12 months. Ongoing pain was higher in WP initially and after 3, 6 months, but not 1 year. Pressure algometry and palpation showed segmental sensitization in the neck and jaw in WPs after 1 week, but not consistently after 3, 6, and 12 months. Time-to-peak pain was reduced and discomfort during cold pressor pain raised in WP as compared to AC.Cervical motor dysfunction using CROM was found in WPs after 1 week, 3, 6, but not 12 months. MVC was significantly lower in WPs than in ACs after 1 week, 12 months but not 3 and 6 months. One-year non-recovery was only encountered in 11 WPs. Non-recovered WPs had consistently significantly higher PRI-T, and neck, shoulder, head, and low-back pain (NRS), and reduction of time-to peak-pain on the cold pressor test (CPT), cervical nociceptive dysfunction by pressure algometry and palpation, and reduced active-cervical-range of-motion, reduced active-neck-flexion/extension, and reported higher neck disability scores than recovered WPs. Conclusion: Cervical motor dysfunction and nociceptive sensitization were present from early after injury in WPs and prolonged in non-recovered WPs and should be targeted for both identification of poor recovery and for future assessment of head and neck injuries and treatment after acute whiplash.",
keywords = "WHIPLASH INJURY, whiplash associated disorders, Maximal voluntary contraction force, nociceptive sensitization, non-recovery, PRESSURE ALGOMETRY, counterstimulation, cold pressor test",
author = "Helge Kasch and Tina Carstensen and Ravn, {Sophie Lykkegaard} and Andersen, {Tonny Elmose} and Lisbeth Frostholm",
year = "2022",
month = jul,
doi = "10.3389/fpain.2022.906638",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
journal = "Frontiers in Pain Research",
issn = "2673-561X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cervical Motor and Nociceptive Dysfunction After an Acute Whiplash Injury and the Association With Long-Term Non-Recovery

T2 - Revisiting a One-Year Prospective Cohort With Ankle Injured Controls

AU - Kasch, Helge

AU - Carstensen, Tina

AU - Ravn, Sophie Lykkegaard

AU - Andersen, Tonny Elmose

AU - Frostholm, Lisbeth

PY - 2022/7

Y1 - 2022/7

N2 - AbstractAims: Exploring the development of cervical motor and nociceptive dysfunction and recovery in patients (WPs) 1 year after whiplash injury compared with ankle-injured controls (ACs).Methods: A 1-year observational prospective study examining consecutive WPs, and age- and sex-matched ACs at 1 week and 3, 6, and 12 months post-injury with semi-structured interviews; the McGill Pain Questionnaire; neurological examination, indicators of peripheral, segmental, and central nociceptive dysfunction: cold pressor test (CPT), pressure algometry, and methodic palpation; indicators of cervical motor dysfunction: active cervical range-of-motion (CROM), neck strength (maximal voluntary contraction flexion/extension (MVC). 12-month work disability was determined. Results: A total of 141 WPs and 40 ACs were included. Total pain rating index (PRI-T) and number of words count were higher in ACs initially, however, higher in WPs after 3, 6, and 12 months. Ongoing pain was higher in WP initially and after 3, 6 months, but not 1 year. Pressure algometry and palpation showed segmental sensitization in the neck and jaw in WPs after 1 week, but not consistently after 3, 6, and 12 months. Time-to-peak pain was reduced and discomfort during cold pressor pain raised in WP as compared to AC.Cervical motor dysfunction using CROM was found in WPs after 1 week, 3, 6, but not 12 months. MVC was significantly lower in WPs than in ACs after 1 week, 12 months but not 3 and 6 months. One-year non-recovery was only encountered in 11 WPs. Non-recovered WPs had consistently significantly higher PRI-T, and neck, shoulder, head, and low-back pain (NRS), and reduction of time-to peak-pain on the cold pressor test (CPT), cervical nociceptive dysfunction by pressure algometry and palpation, and reduced active-cervical-range of-motion, reduced active-neck-flexion/extension, and reported higher neck disability scores than recovered WPs. Conclusion: Cervical motor dysfunction and nociceptive sensitization were present from early after injury in WPs and prolonged in non-recovered WPs and should be targeted for both identification of poor recovery and for future assessment of head and neck injuries and treatment after acute whiplash.

AB - AbstractAims: Exploring the development of cervical motor and nociceptive dysfunction and recovery in patients (WPs) 1 year after whiplash injury compared with ankle-injured controls (ACs).Methods: A 1-year observational prospective study examining consecutive WPs, and age- and sex-matched ACs at 1 week and 3, 6, and 12 months post-injury with semi-structured interviews; the McGill Pain Questionnaire; neurological examination, indicators of peripheral, segmental, and central nociceptive dysfunction: cold pressor test (CPT), pressure algometry, and methodic palpation; indicators of cervical motor dysfunction: active cervical range-of-motion (CROM), neck strength (maximal voluntary contraction flexion/extension (MVC). 12-month work disability was determined. Results: A total of 141 WPs and 40 ACs were included. Total pain rating index (PRI-T) and number of words count were higher in ACs initially, however, higher in WPs after 3, 6, and 12 months. Ongoing pain was higher in WP initially and after 3, 6 months, but not 1 year. Pressure algometry and palpation showed segmental sensitization in the neck and jaw in WPs after 1 week, but not consistently after 3, 6, and 12 months. Time-to-peak pain was reduced and discomfort during cold pressor pain raised in WP as compared to AC.Cervical motor dysfunction using CROM was found in WPs after 1 week, 3, 6, but not 12 months. MVC was significantly lower in WPs than in ACs after 1 week, 12 months but not 3 and 6 months. One-year non-recovery was only encountered in 11 WPs. Non-recovered WPs had consistently significantly higher PRI-T, and neck, shoulder, head, and low-back pain (NRS), and reduction of time-to peak-pain on the cold pressor test (CPT), cervical nociceptive dysfunction by pressure algometry and palpation, and reduced active-cervical-range of-motion, reduced active-neck-flexion/extension, and reported higher neck disability scores than recovered WPs. Conclusion: Cervical motor dysfunction and nociceptive sensitization were present from early after injury in WPs and prolonged in non-recovered WPs and should be targeted for both identification of poor recovery and for future assessment of head and neck injuries and treatment after acute whiplash.

KW - WHIPLASH INJURY

KW - whiplash associated disorders

KW - Maximal voluntary contraction force

KW - nociceptive sensitization

KW - non-recovery

KW - PRESSURE ALGOMETRY

KW - counterstimulation

KW - cold pressor test

U2 - 10.3389/fpain.2022.906638

DO - 10.3389/fpain.2022.906638

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 35875480

VL - 3

JO - Frontiers in Pain Research

JF - Frontiers in Pain Research

SN - 2673-561X

M1 - 906638

ER -