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Cardiovascular event rates and trajectories of LDL-cholesterol levels and lipid-lowering therapy in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: A population-based cohort study

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Cardiovascular event rates and trajectories of LDL-cholesterol levels and lipid-lowering therapy in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease : A population-based cohort study. / Sundbøll, Jens; Larsen, Anders Peter; Veres, Katalin; Adelborg, Kasper; Sørensen, Henrik Toft.

In: Thrombosis Research, Vol. 183, 11.2019, p. 124-130.

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@article{2c546525e10c4797830f297dccd4dec4,
title = "Cardiovascular event rates and trajectories of LDL-cholesterol levels and lipid-lowering therapy in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: A population-based cohort study",
abstract = "Background: An understanding of cardiovascular event rates and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and trajectories in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is needed to evaluate treatment goals and adherence to guidelines. Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study in the North and Central Denmark Regions. Patients with prevalent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, or peripheral artery disease) during 2006–2009 were identified. All patients received lipid-lowering therapy (statins or ezetimibe) and had LDL-C levels ≥1.8 mmol/L at baseline (January 1, 2010). We followed patients for 6 years until a primary composite outcome of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina, or coronary revascularization. Additionally, we characterized changes in LDL-C levels and use of statins during follow-up. Results: The study included 10,772 patients (median age 69.2 years, 60.4% male). The overall event rate for the primary outcome was 62.7 (95% confidence interval: 59.2–66.2) per 1000 person-years. This event rate was higher among men than among women and increased with age and baseline LDL-C levels. Approximately 25% of patients with LDL-C measurements during follow-up achieved LDL-C levels below 1.8 mmol/L. Of the approximately two-thirds of patients using statins at the end of follow-up, nearly all patients (97%) received high-intensity therapy. Conclusions: In this population of patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, we found high cardiovascular event rates, which increased with baseline LDL-C levels. Although most patients were on high-intensity statin therapy at end of follow-up, only one-quarter reached the guideline-recommended target LDL-C level ≤ 1.8 mmol/L.",
keywords = "Atherosclerosis, Epidemiology, Lipids, Rehabilitation",
author = "Jens Sundb{\o}ll and Larsen, {Anders Peter} and Katalin Veres and Kasper Adelborg and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik Toft}",
year = "2019",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1016/j.thromres.2019.09.034",
language = "English",
volume = "183",
pages = "124--130",
journal = "Thrombosis Research",
issn = "0049-3848",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cardiovascular event rates and trajectories of LDL-cholesterol levels and lipid-lowering therapy in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

T2 - A population-based cohort study

AU - Sundbøll, Jens

AU - Larsen, Anders Peter

AU - Veres, Katalin

AU - Adelborg, Kasper

AU - Sørensen, Henrik Toft

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - Background: An understanding of cardiovascular event rates and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and trajectories in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is needed to evaluate treatment goals and adherence to guidelines. Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study in the North and Central Denmark Regions. Patients with prevalent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, or peripheral artery disease) during 2006–2009 were identified. All patients received lipid-lowering therapy (statins or ezetimibe) and had LDL-C levels ≥1.8 mmol/L at baseline (January 1, 2010). We followed patients for 6 years until a primary composite outcome of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina, or coronary revascularization. Additionally, we characterized changes in LDL-C levels and use of statins during follow-up. Results: The study included 10,772 patients (median age 69.2 years, 60.4% male). The overall event rate for the primary outcome was 62.7 (95% confidence interval: 59.2–66.2) per 1000 person-years. This event rate was higher among men than among women and increased with age and baseline LDL-C levels. Approximately 25% of patients with LDL-C measurements during follow-up achieved LDL-C levels below 1.8 mmol/L. Of the approximately two-thirds of patients using statins at the end of follow-up, nearly all patients (97%) received high-intensity therapy. Conclusions: In this population of patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, we found high cardiovascular event rates, which increased with baseline LDL-C levels. Although most patients were on high-intensity statin therapy at end of follow-up, only one-quarter reached the guideline-recommended target LDL-C level ≤ 1.8 mmol/L.

AB - Background: An understanding of cardiovascular event rates and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and trajectories in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is needed to evaluate treatment goals and adherence to guidelines. Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study in the North and Central Denmark Regions. Patients with prevalent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, or peripheral artery disease) during 2006–2009 were identified. All patients received lipid-lowering therapy (statins or ezetimibe) and had LDL-C levels ≥1.8 mmol/L at baseline (January 1, 2010). We followed patients for 6 years until a primary composite outcome of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, non-hemorrhagic stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina, or coronary revascularization. Additionally, we characterized changes in LDL-C levels and use of statins during follow-up. Results: The study included 10,772 patients (median age 69.2 years, 60.4% male). The overall event rate for the primary outcome was 62.7 (95% confidence interval: 59.2–66.2) per 1000 person-years. This event rate was higher among men than among women and increased with age and baseline LDL-C levels. Approximately 25% of patients with LDL-C measurements during follow-up achieved LDL-C levels below 1.8 mmol/L. Of the approximately two-thirds of patients using statins at the end of follow-up, nearly all patients (97%) received high-intensity therapy. Conclusions: In this population of patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, we found high cardiovascular event rates, which increased with baseline LDL-C levels. Although most patients were on high-intensity statin therapy at end of follow-up, only one-quarter reached the guideline-recommended target LDL-C level ≤ 1.8 mmol/L.

KW - Atherosclerosis

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Lipids

KW - Rehabilitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074128601&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.thromres.2019.09.034

DO - 10.1016/j.thromres.2019.09.034

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31677592

AN - SCOPUS:85074128601

VL - 183

SP - 124

EP - 130

JO - Thrombosis Research

JF - Thrombosis Research

SN - 0049-3848

ER -