Department of Economics and Business Economics

Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing?

Research output: Working paperResearch

Standard

Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing? / Gravert, Christina Annette.

Aarhus : Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet, 2012.

Research output: Working paperResearch

Harvard

Gravert, CA 2012 'Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing?' Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet, Aarhus.

APA

Gravert, C. A. (2012). Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing? Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet. Economics Working Papers, No. 2012-21

CBE

Gravert CA. 2012. Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing?. Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet.

MLA

Gravert, Christina Annette Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing?. Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet. (Economics Working Papers; Journal number 2012-21). 2012., 17 p.

Vancouver

Gravert CA. Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing? Aarhus: Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet. 2012 Sep 14.

Author

Gravert, Christina Annette. / Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing?. Aarhus : Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet, 2012. (Economics Working Papers; No. 2012-21).

Bibtex

@techreport{bcdc66cfeff04448acc4187f634c2b4a,
title = "Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing?",
abstract = "Are people more likely to steal when the payoff they deserve is determined randomly or when it depends on their performance in a difficult task? In this paper I investigate how the probability of stealing is affected by the way in which payoff is earned. After answering a short survey one group was asked to roll a die to determine their payoff, while the other group had three minutes to find matching numbers in a matrix task. Participants then paid themselves unobserved by the experimenter. I find that the participants who earnedtheir payoff according to performance were three times more likely to take the (undeserved) maximum payoff than the participants in the random payment scheme. In contrast to previous findings in the cheating literature, stealing is an all-or-nothing decision rather than a trade-off between a slightly higher payoff and the desire to keep ones moral values intact. The results support the theory that unethical behavior is increased by a sense of entitlement, which is more pronounced when wealth depends on performance than on the roll of a die.",
keywords = "Experiments, Deception, Entitlement, Justification",
author = "Gravert, {Christina Annette}",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "14",
language = "English",
series = "Economics Working Papers",
publisher = "Institut for {\O}konomi, Aarhus Universitet",
number = "2012-21",
type = "WorkingPaper",
institution = "Institut for {\O}konomi, Aarhus Universitet",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing?

AU - Gravert, Christina Annette

PY - 2012/9/14

Y1 - 2012/9/14

N2 - Are people more likely to steal when the payoff they deserve is determined randomly or when it depends on their performance in a difficult task? In this paper I investigate how the probability of stealing is affected by the way in which payoff is earned. After answering a short survey one group was asked to roll a die to determine their payoff, while the other group had three minutes to find matching numbers in a matrix task. Participants then paid themselves unobserved by the experimenter. I find that the participants who earnedtheir payoff according to performance were three times more likely to take the (undeserved) maximum payoff than the participants in the random payment scheme. In contrast to previous findings in the cheating literature, stealing is an all-or-nothing decision rather than a trade-off between a slightly higher payoff and the desire to keep ones moral values intact. The results support the theory that unethical behavior is increased by a sense of entitlement, which is more pronounced when wealth depends on performance than on the roll of a die.

AB - Are people more likely to steal when the payoff they deserve is determined randomly or when it depends on their performance in a difficult task? In this paper I investigate how the probability of stealing is affected by the way in which payoff is earned. After answering a short survey one group was asked to roll a die to determine their payoff, while the other group had three minutes to find matching numbers in a matrix task. Participants then paid themselves unobserved by the experimenter. I find that the participants who earnedtheir payoff according to performance were three times more likely to take the (undeserved) maximum payoff than the participants in the random payment scheme. In contrast to previous findings in the cheating literature, stealing is an all-or-nothing decision rather than a trade-off between a slightly higher payoff and the desire to keep ones moral values intact. The results support the theory that unethical behavior is increased by a sense of entitlement, which is more pronounced when wealth depends on performance than on the roll of a die.

KW - Experiments, Deception, Entitlement, Justification

M3 - Working paper

T3 - Economics Working Papers

BT - Can a sense of entitlement increase stealing?

PB - Institut for Økonomi, Aarhus Universitet

CY - Aarhus

ER -