Bullying

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingEncyclopedia entryResearchpeer-review

Bullying is a widespread problem among children. This entry will look at its prevalence and offer an overview of some of the definitions developed and discussed by researchers working within childhood studies, and by practitioners trying to implement researchers’ understandings of bullying in their work in schools and other institutions for children.
Approximately 12 % of boys and 10 % of girls, 11 year old, surveyed in the latest Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, released 2016, reported being bullied at school at least two or three times a month in the preceding months. Bullying is often associated with a general lack of wellbeing in the classroom and a negative classroom culture – as also found by the Danish eXbus-team in a survey among 1052 Danish 15-17-year-old students, as described by Hansen, Henningsen and Kofoed in 2014.
Researchers discuss how to define what bullying is or why it occurs. They discuss whether bullying should be seen as a form of individual aggression, as a form of social violence, or as a result of dysfunctional group dynamics. Researchers and practitioners develop various forms of intervention program and compile guidelines for how school professionals should act in cases of bullying; however such programs and guidelines vary considerably depending on whether they are rooted in individualistic or social approaches to and definitions of bullying.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe SAGE Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood Studies : vol. I
EditorsDaniel Thomas Cook
Number of pages6
Volume4
Place of publicationThousands Oaks, California
PublisherSAGE Publications
Publication year2020
ISBN (print)978-1-4739-4292-9
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-5297-1438-8
Publication statusPublished - 2020

    Research areas

  • Bullying, Bullying and children, bullying and school, Bullying and intervention, bullying and prevalence, social exclusion anxiety, individualized understanding of bullying

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 151624783