Department of Economics and Business Economics

Binge drinking during pregnancy and psychosis-like experiences in the child at age 11

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  • Laura Stonor Gregersen, Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, P.O. Box 2099, 1014, Copenhagen K, Denmark. laura_gregersen@hotmail.com.
  • ,
  • Julie Werenberg Dreier
  • Katrine Strandberg-Larsen, Section of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, P.O. Box 2099, 1014, Copenhagen K, Denmark.

Increased frequency of psychosis-like experiences (PLEs) has been previously reported in children born to mothers with high general levels of alcohol intake during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to examine whether the risk of PLEs was likewise elevated in children prenatally exposed to binge drinking. Participants were 44,326 children and their mothers enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort from 1996-2002. Information on maternal binge drinking was collected twice in pregnancy by telephone interview and PLEs in the children were ascertained in a Web-based questionnaire at age 11. Analyses were carried out using weighted multinomial logistic regression models. Maternal binge drinking was relatively common among the participating women (27%). The adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) for reporting one definite PLE symptom was 1.04 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-1.13) and 1.06 (95% CI 0.95-1.20) for two or more symptoms in children exposed compared to unexposed to binge drinking during pregnancy. Furthermore, no association was found when addressing frequency and timing of binge drinking, nor for various levels of average alcohol consumption. When sub-dividing PLEs into specific types of experiences however, a slightly, although non-significant, increased risk was observed for one specific delusional idea, receiving messages from radio/TV, following prenatal exposure to binge drinking. Our results provide no evidence of an association between maternal binge drinking, nor average alcohol consumption in pregnancy, and overall occurrence of PLEs in the offspring. However, our results indicated that binge drinking might be related to a specific PLE.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume29
Issue3
Pages (from-to)385-393
Number of pages9
ISSN1018-8827
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

    Research areas

  • Alcohol, Binge drinking, Child, Pregnancy, Psychotic disorders, Psychotic experiences

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