Bilateral ischaemic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex are anxiogenic in the rat

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Bilateral ischaemic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex are anxiogenic in the rat. / Déziel, Robert A; Tasker, R Andrew.

In: Acta Neuropsychiatrica, Vol. 30, No. 3, 06.2018, p. 181-186.

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Déziel, Robert A ; Tasker, R Andrew. / Bilateral ischaemic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex are anxiogenic in the rat. In: Acta Neuropsychiatrica. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 181-186.

Bibtex

@article{6e95bc1aa60c425f8e8390d2230ff240,
title = "Bilateral ischaemic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex are anxiogenic in the rat",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Stroke patients often suffer from delayed disturbances of mood and cognition. In rodents, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in both higher order cognition and emotion. Our objective was to determine if bilateral focal ischaemic lesions restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) could be used to model post-stroke anxiety and/or cognitive deficits.METHODS: Groups of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9) received bilateral injections of either endothelin-1 (ET-1) (400 pmol) or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid) into the mPFC and were tested at various times using both a test of temporal order memory and in an elevated plus maze. Lesions were verified histologically.RESULTS: ET-1 lesioned rats had reduced mobility on post-surgery day 8 that had resolved by day 29 at which time they spent significantly more time in the closed arm of the plus maze CONCLUSION: We conclude that ischaemic lesions localised to the mPFC can be used to model post-stroke anxiety in rats.",
keywords = "Animals, Anxiety/etiology, Behavior, Animal/physiology, Brain Ischemia/chemically induced, Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology, Disease Models, Animal, Endothelin-1/pharmacology, Male, Maze Learning/physiology, Memory/physiology, Prefrontal Cortex/pathology, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Stroke/chemically induced, cognition, prefrontal cortex, stroke, anxiety",
author = "D{\'e}ziel, {Robert A} and Tasker, {R Andrew}",
year = "2018",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1017/neu.2017.32",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "181--186",
journal = "Acta Neuropsychiatrica",
issn = "0924-2708",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bilateral ischaemic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex are anxiogenic in the rat

AU - Déziel, Robert A

AU - Tasker, R Andrew

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Stroke patients often suffer from delayed disturbances of mood and cognition. In rodents, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in both higher order cognition and emotion. Our objective was to determine if bilateral focal ischaemic lesions restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) could be used to model post-stroke anxiety and/or cognitive deficits.METHODS: Groups of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9) received bilateral injections of either endothelin-1 (ET-1) (400 pmol) or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid) into the mPFC and were tested at various times using both a test of temporal order memory and in an elevated plus maze. Lesions were verified histologically.RESULTS: ET-1 lesioned rats had reduced mobility on post-surgery day 8 that had resolved by day 29 at which time they spent significantly more time in the closed arm of the plus maze CONCLUSION: We conclude that ischaemic lesions localised to the mPFC can be used to model post-stroke anxiety in rats.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Stroke patients often suffer from delayed disturbances of mood and cognition. In rodents, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in both higher order cognition and emotion. Our objective was to determine if bilateral focal ischaemic lesions restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) could be used to model post-stroke anxiety and/or cognitive deficits.METHODS: Groups of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9) received bilateral injections of either endothelin-1 (ET-1) (400 pmol) or vehicle (artificial cerebrospinal fluid) into the mPFC and were tested at various times using both a test of temporal order memory and in an elevated plus maze. Lesions were verified histologically.RESULTS: ET-1 lesioned rats had reduced mobility on post-surgery day 8 that had resolved by day 29 at which time they spent significantly more time in the closed arm of the plus maze CONCLUSION: We conclude that ischaemic lesions localised to the mPFC can be used to model post-stroke anxiety in rats.

KW - Animals

KW - Anxiety/etiology

KW - Behavior, Animal/physiology

KW - Brain Ischemia/chemically induced

KW - Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology

KW - Disease Models, Animal

KW - Endothelin-1/pharmacology

KW - Male

KW - Maze Learning/physiology

KW - Memory/physiology

KW - Prefrontal Cortex/pathology

KW - Rats

KW - Rats, Sprague-Dawley

KW - Stroke/chemically induced

KW - cognition

KW - prefrontal cortex

KW - stroke

KW - anxiety

U2 - 10.1017/neu.2017.32

DO - 10.1017/neu.2017.32

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29202895

VL - 30

SP - 181

EP - 186

JO - Acta Neuropsychiatrica

JF - Acta Neuropsychiatrica

SN - 0924-2708

IS - 3

ER -