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Between Bodies and Data: Modalities of Participation in Sound Art

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

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Between Bodies and Data : Modalities of Participation in Sound Art. / Keylin, Vadim.

2017. Abstract from Music/Sonic Art, Karlsruhe, Germany.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Keylin, V 2017, 'Between Bodies and Data: Modalities of Participation in Sound Art', Music/Sonic Art, Karlsruhe, Germany, 06/07/2017 - 09/07/2017.

APA

Keylin, V. (2017). Between Bodies and Data: Modalities of Participation in Sound Art. Abstract from Music/Sonic Art, Karlsruhe, Germany.

CBE

Keylin V. 2017. Between Bodies and Data: Modalities of Participation in Sound Art. Abstract from Music/Sonic Art, Karlsruhe, Germany.

MLA

Keylin, Vadim Between Bodies and Data: Modalities of Participation in Sound Art. Music/Sonic Art, 06 Jul 2017, Karlsruhe, Germany, Conference abstract for conference, 2017.

Vancouver

Keylin V. Between Bodies and Data: Modalities of Participation in Sound Art. 2017. Abstract from Music/Sonic Art, Karlsruhe, Germany.

Author

Keylin, Vadim. / Between Bodies and Data : Modalities of Participation in Sound Art. Abstract from Music/Sonic Art, Karlsruhe, Germany.

Bibtex

@conference{03ae82aea19147fe936b35e885aeb377,
title = "Between Bodies and Data: Modalities of Participation in Sound Art",
abstract = "Audience participation, engaging the listeners into the sound-making process is a strong thread running through much of sound art practice. Being an inherently relational phenomenon, sound invites the listeners to a dialog of sorts, both with the artwork and with other listeners. However, this process is far from homogenous. Both the technologies, employed by the artist and the structure of the artwork determine the way participation is carried out in each particular case and the extent and character of influence the participants{\textquoteright} action have on sonic result. In my paper, I will discuss the range of affordances – or even “{\"i}nterfaces” – for participation that a sound art works may have. At the one end of this spectrum lie the classic sound sculptures of e.g. Baschet brothers – musical instruments meant for the audience to play. These invite a visceral engagement, emphasizing the corporeality of both listening and sound-making activity. At the other end, lie artworks that sonify digitally collected social data – like e.g. #tweetscapes by Anselm Venezian Nehls and Tarik Barri, which translated the activities of German Twitter segment into audiovisual experience. #tweetscapes takes the bodies out of the equation, working instead with the disembodied – and in a way depersonalized – streams of data, nevertheless generated by the participants. Finally, a middle ground can be found in the augmented reality approaches – like those of Kaffe Matthews Sonic Bike rides or Benoit Maubrey{\textquoteright}s Speaker Sculptures – that tie the physical space with the virtual one, allowing for transcending of both bodily limitations and the ephemerality of the digital. Drawing on these examples, I will attempt to build a paradigm for participatory processes, characteristic of sound art.",
author = "Vadim Keylin",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
day = "6",
language = "English",
note = "Music/Sonic Art : Practices and Theories, MuSA ; Conference date: 06-07-2017 Through 09-07-2017",
url = "http://zilmusic.com/musa2017/",

}

RIS

TY - ABST

T1 - Between Bodies and Data

T2 - Music/Sonic Art

AU - Keylin, Vadim

N1 - Conference code: 8

PY - 2017/7/6

Y1 - 2017/7/6

N2 - Audience participation, engaging the listeners into the sound-making process is a strong thread running through much of sound art practice. Being an inherently relational phenomenon, sound invites the listeners to a dialog of sorts, both with the artwork and with other listeners. However, this process is far from homogenous. Both the technologies, employed by the artist and the structure of the artwork determine the way participation is carried out in each particular case and the extent and character of influence the participants’ action have on sonic result. In my paper, I will discuss the range of affordances – or even “ïnterfaces” – for participation that a sound art works may have. At the one end of this spectrum lie the classic sound sculptures of e.g. Baschet brothers – musical instruments meant for the audience to play. These invite a visceral engagement, emphasizing the corporeality of both listening and sound-making activity. At the other end, lie artworks that sonify digitally collected social data – like e.g. #tweetscapes by Anselm Venezian Nehls and Tarik Barri, which translated the activities of German Twitter segment into audiovisual experience. #tweetscapes takes the bodies out of the equation, working instead with the disembodied – and in a way depersonalized – streams of data, nevertheless generated by the participants. Finally, a middle ground can be found in the augmented reality approaches – like those of Kaffe Matthews Sonic Bike rides or Benoit Maubrey’s Speaker Sculptures – that tie the physical space with the virtual one, allowing for transcending of both bodily limitations and the ephemerality of the digital. Drawing on these examples, I will attempt to build a paradigm for participatory processes, characteristic of sound art.

AB - Audience participation, engaging the listeners into the sound-making process is a strong thread running through much of sound art practice. Being an inherently relational phenomenon, sound invites the listeners to a dialog of sorts, both with the artwork and with other listeners. However, this process is far from homogenous. Both the technologies, employed by the artist and the structure of the artwork determine the way participation is carried out in each particular case and the extent and character of influence the participants’ action have on sonic result. In my paper, I will discuss the range of affordances – or even “ïnterfaces” – for participation that a sound art works may have. At the one end of this spectrum lie the classic sound sculptures of e.g. Baschet brothers – musical instruments meant for the audience to play. These invite a visceral engagement, emphasizing the corporeality of both listening and sound-making activity. At the other end, lie artworks that sonify digitally collected social data – like e.g. #tweetscapes by Anselm Venezian Nehls and Tarik Barri, which translated the activities of German Twitter segment into audiovisual experience. #tweetscapes takes the bodies out of the equation, working instead with the disembodied – and in a way depersonalized – streams of data, nevertheless generated by the participants. Finally, a middle ground can be found in the augmented reality approaches – like those of Kaffe Matthews Sonic Bike rides or Benoit Maubrey’s Speaker Sculptures – that tie the physical space with the virtual one, allowing for transcending of both bodily limitations and the ephemerality of the digital. Drawing on these examples, I will attempt to build a paradigm for participatory processes, characteristic of sound art.

UR - http://zilmusic.com/musa2017/programme.html

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

Y2 - 6 July 2017 through 9 July 2017

ER -