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Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain

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Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain. / Brattico, Elvira; Olcese, Chiara; Tervaniemi, Mari.

Springer Handbooks. Springer, 2018. p. 441-452 (Springer Handbooks).

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Brattico, E, Olcese, C & Tervaniemi, M 2018, Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain. in Springer Handbooks. Springer, Springer Handbooks, pp. 441-452. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_22

APA

Brattico, E., Olcese, C., & Tervaniemi, M. (2018). Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain. In Springer Handbooks (pp. 441-452). Springer. Springer Handbooks https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_22

CBE

Brattico E, Olcese C, Tervaniemi M. 2018. Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain. In Springer Handbooks. Springer. pp. 441-452. (Springer Handbooks). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_22

MLA

Brattico, Elvira, Chiara Olcese and Mari Tervaniemi "Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain". Springer Handbooks. Springer. (Springer Handbooks). 2018, 441-452. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_22

Vancouver

Brattico E, Olcese C, Tervaniemi M. Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain. In Springer Handbooks. Springer. 2018. p. 441-452. (Springer Handbooks). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_22

Author

Brattico, Elvira ; Olcese, Chiara ; Tervaniemi, Mari. / Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain. Springer Handbooks. Springer, 2018. pp. 441-452 (Springer Handbooks).

Bibtex

@inbook{3e14f2dfe5464678be3c8f66a32f9cf1,
title = "Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain",
abstract = "This chapter introduces neurophysiological evidence on the dissociation between unconscious and conscious aspects of musical sound perception. The focus is on research conducted with the event-related potential (ERPevent-relatedpotential (ERP)) technique, which allows chronometric investigation of information-processing stages during music listening. Findings suggest that automatic processes are confined to the auditory cortex and might even involve the discrimination of deviations from simple musical scale rules. In turn, voluntary, cognitive processes, likely originating from the inferior prefrontal cortex, are necessary to understand more complex musical rules, such as tonality and harmony. The implications of understanding how and to what extent music is processed below the level of consciousness are discussed in rehabilitation and therapeutic settings.",
author = "Elvira Brattico and Chiara Olcese and Mari Tervaniemi",
year = "2018",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_22",
language = "English",
series = "Springer Handbooks",
publisher = "Springer",
pages = "441--452",
booktitle = "Springer Handbooks",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Automatic Processing of Musical Sounds in the Human Brain

AU - Brattico, Elvira

AU - Olcese, Chiara

AU - Tervaniemi, Mari

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - This chapter introduces neurophysiological evidence on the dissociation between unconscious and conscious aspects of musical sound perception. The focus is on research conducted with the event-related potential (ERPevent-relatedpotential (ERP)) technique, which allows chronometric investigation of information-processing stages during music listening. Findings suggest that automatic processes are confined to the auditory cortex and might even involve the discrimination of deviations from simple musical scale rules. In turn, voluntary, cognitive processes, likely originating from the inferior prefrontal cortex, are necessary to understand more complex musical rules, such as tonality and harmony. The implications of understanding how and to what extent music is processed below the level of consciousness are discussed in rehabilitation and therapeutic settings.

AB - This chapter introduces neurophysiological evidence on the dissociation between unconscious and conscious aspects of musical sound perception. The focus is on research conducted with the event-related potential (ERPevent-relatedpotential (ERP)) technique, which allows chronometric investigation of information-processing stages during music listening. Findings suggest that automatic processes are confined to the auditory cortex and might even involve the discrimination of deviations from simple musical scale rules. In turn, voluntary, cognitive processes, likely originating from the inferior prefrontal cortex, are necessary to understand more complex musical rules, such as tonality and harmony. The implications of understanding how and to what extent music is processed below the level of consciousness are discussed in rehabilitation and therapeutic settings.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85075938395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_22

DO - 10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_22

M3 - Book chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85075938395

T3 - Springer Handbooks

SP - 441

EP - 452

BT - Springer Handbooks

PB - Springer

ER -