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Are New Work Practices and New Technologies Biased against Immigrant Workers?

Research output: Working paperResearch

  • Michael Rosholm
  • Marianne Røed, Institut for Samfunnsforskning, Norway
  • Pål Schøne, Institut for Samfunnsforskning, Norway
  • http://www.asb.dk/forskning/forskningscentreoggrupper/forskningscentre/centreforresearchinintegrationeducationqualificationsandmarg/
  • http://www.asb.dk/omos/institutter/departmentofeconomics/
New technologies and new work practices have been introduced and implemented over a broad range in the production process in most advanced industrialised countries during the last two decades. New work organisation practices like team organisation and job rotation require interpersonal communication to a larger extent compared to the traditional assembly line types of production. In addition to handling the formal language, communication in this respect includes country-specific skills related to understanding social and cultural codes, unwritten rules, implicit communication, norms etc. In this paper we analyse whether these developments - by increasing the importance of communication and informal human capital - have had a negative effect on employment opportunities of immigrants. The results show that firms that use PCs intensively and firms that give their employees broad autonomy employ fewer non-Western immigrants who have not been raised in Norway (i.e. arrived as adults). Furthermore, the negative relationships are especially strong for low-skilled non-Western immigrants. These results may add support to the hypothesis stating that new technologies and (some) new work practices are biased against non-Western immigrant workers, and especially those with low formal skills
Original languageEnglish
Place of publicationBonn
PublisherIZA. Institute for the Study of Labor / Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit
Number of pages25
Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Research areas

  • Immigrants, New technology, New work practices, Employment

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