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Animal-breeding schemes using genomic information need breeding plans designed to maximise long-term genetic gains

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Animal-breeding schemes using genomic information need breeding plans designed to maximise long-term genetic gains. / Henryon, Mark; Berg, Peer; Sørensen, Anders Christian.

In: Livestock Science, Vol. 166, 08.2014, p. 38-47.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

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Henryon, Mark ; Berg, Peer ; Sørensen, Anders Christian. / Animal-breeding schemes using genomic information need breeding plans designed to maximise long-term genetic gains. In: Livestock Science. 2014 ; Vol. 166. pp. 38-47.

Bibtex

@article{ca6bd3bfb8314d17b5a490994c9780d7,
title = "Animal-breeding schemes using genomic information need breeding plans designed to maximise long-term genetic gains",
abstract = "We argue that animal-breeding schemes need well-designed breeding plans to maximise long-term genetic gains from genomic information. Genomic information has been implemented in livestock breeding schemes with ad hoc breeding plans, suggesting that the potential benefits of genomic information are not being fully exploited. Breeding schemes need well-designed breeding plans to exploit the benefits of genomic information for two reasons. First, there are several components of breeding schemes with genomic information that impact on long-term genetic gains. Second, these components interact, which implies that breeding schemes need to optimise components simultaneously in order to maximise long-term genetic gains. Designing breeding plans that optimise components simultaneously is a complex task. In more cases than not, breeding schemes, their components, and interactions between these components do not allow optimum breeding plans to be designed by mere reasoning. We recommend using decision frameworks to design breeding plans for schemes that use genomic information: testing sound hypotheses by designing and executing controlled experiments using decision tools, such as mathematical-statistical models. These decision frameworks enable us to design optimum breeding plans by providing an objective and theoretical basis to make and validate breeding decisions, enabling us to understand the underlying mechanisms of breeding schemes with genomic information, and allowing us to test the practical implementation of breeding decisions against theoretical models. Genomic information is an exciting prospect for animal breeding, and there is clearly an important role for breeding plans that maximise long-term genetic gains in breeding schemes using genomic information. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Animal breeding, Breeding plans, Genomic selection, Inbreeding, Decision framework, DAIRY-CATTLE, GENOTYPING STRATEGIES, OVERLAPPING GENERATIONS, INBREEDING COEFFICIENTS, CONTRIBUTION SELECTION, CONSERVATION PROGRAMS, DYNAMIC SELECTION, PREDEFINED RATE, WIDE SELECTION, DATA SETS",
author = "Mark Henryon and Peer Berg and S{\o}rensen, {Anders Christian}",
note = "Project 12225",
year = "2014",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1016/j.livsci.2014.06.016",
language = "English",
volume = "166",
pages = "38--47",
journal = "Livestock Science",
issn = "1871-1413",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Animal-breeding schemes using genomic information need breeding plans designed to maximise long-term genetic gains

AU - Henryon, Mark

AU - Berg, Peer

AU - Sørensen, Anders Christian

N1 - Project 12225

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - We argue that animal-breeding schemes need well-designed breeding plans to maximise long-term genetic gains from genomic information. Genomic information has been implemented in livestock breeding schemes with ad hoc breeding plans, suggesting that the potential benefits of genomic information are not being fully exploited. Breeding schemes need well-designed breeding plans to exploit the benefits of genomic information for two reasons. First, there are several components of breeding schemes with genomic information that impact on long-term genetic gains. Second, these components interact, which implies that breeding schemes need to optimise components simultaneously in order to maximise long-term genetic gains. Designing breeding plans that optimise components simultaneously is a complex task. In more cases than not, breeding schemes, their components, and interactions between these components do not allow optimum breeding plans to be designed by mere reasoning. We recommend using decision frameworks to design breeding plans for schemes that use genomic information: testing sound hypotheses by designing and executing controlled experiments using decision tools, such as mathematical-statistical models. These decision frameworks enable us to design optimum breeding plans by providing an objective and theoretical basis to make and validate breeding decisions, enabling us to understand the underlying mechanisms of breeding schemes with genomic information, and allowing us to test the practical implementation of breeding decisions against theoretical models. Genomic information is an exciting prospect for animal breeding, and there is clearly an important role for breeding plans that maximise long-term genetic gains in breeding schemes using genomic information. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - We argue that animal-breeding schemes need well-designed breeding plans to maximise long-term genetic gains from genomic information. Genomic information has been implemented in livestock breeding schemes with ad hoc breeding plans, suggesting that the potential benefits of genomic information are not being fully exploited. Breeding schemes need well-designed breeding plans to exploit the benefits of genomic information for two reasons. First, there are several components of breeding schemes with genomic information that impact on long-term genetic gains. Second, these components interact, which implies that breeding schemes need to optimise components simultaneously in order to maximise long-term genetic gains. Designing breeding plans that optimise components simultaneously is a complex task. In more cases than not, breeding schemes, their components, and interactions between these components do not allow optimum breeding plans to be designed by mere reasoning. We recommend using decision frameworks to design breeding plans for schemes that use genomic information: testing sound hypotheses by designing and executing controlled experiments using decision tools, such as mathematical-statistical models. These decision frameworks enable us to design optimum breeding plans by providing an objective and theoretical basis to make and validate breeding decisions, enabling us to understand the underlying mechanisms of breeding schemes with genomic information, and allowing us to test the practical implementation of breeding decisions against theoretical models. Genomic information is an exciting prospect for animal breeding, and there is clearly an important role for breeding plans that maximise long-term genetic gains in breeding schemes using genomic information. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KW - Animal breeding

KW - Breeding plans

KW - Genomic selection

KW - Inbreeding

KW - Decision framework

KW - DAIRY-CATTLE

KW - GENOTYPING STRATEGIES

KW - OVERLAPPING GENERATIONS

KW - INBREEDING COEFFICIENTS

KW - CONTRIBUTION SELECTION

KW - CONSERVATION PROGRAMS

KW - DYNAMIC SELECTION

KW - PREDEFINED RATE

KW - WIDE SELECTION

KW - DATA SETS

U2 - 10.1016/j.livsci.2014.06.016

DO - 10.1016/j.livsci.2014.06.016

M3 - Review

VL - 166

SP - 38

EP - 47

JO - Livestock Science

JF - Livestock Science

SN - 1871-1413

ER -