Anemia and growth retardation associated with Schistosoma haematobium infection in Mali: a possible subtle impact of a neglected tropical disease

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DOI

  • Chalotte W Stecher
  • ,
  • Moussa Sacko, Laboratory of Parasitology, Institut National de Recherche en Sante Publique, Bamako, Mali., Mali
  • Henry Madsen, Section for Parasitology and Aquatic Diseases, SUND, University of Copenhagen, Denmark., Denmark
  • Shona Wilson, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Christian Wejse
  • Adama D Keita, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technology, Bamako, Mali., Mali
  • Aly Landouré, Laboratory of Parasitology, Institut National de Recherche en Sante Publique, Bamako, Mali., Mali
  • Mamadou S Traoré, Laboratory of Parasitology, Institut National de Recherche en Sante Publique, Bamako, Mali., Mali
  • Per Kallestrup
  • Eskild Petersen
  • Birgitte Vennervald, Section for Parasitology and Aquatic Diseases, SUND, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate a possible association of Schistosoma haematobium with child growth development and describe a plausible schistosomiasis-related anemia in children and adults in a highly schistosomiasis endemic area of Mali.

Methods: Urine, feces and blood samples from 399 participants of both sexes (2-40 years of age) were analyzed and supplemented by anthropometric measurements.

Results: S. haematobium prevalence was 79.8%, S. mansoni 13.2% and Plasmodium falciparum 80.2%. S. haematobium infection intensity as five categories was significantly associated with anemia; i.e., odds of having anemia in the highest and the next highest category was 3.25 (95% CL 1.61-6.55; p<0.01) and 2.45 (95% CL 1.28-4.70; p<0.01), respectively, of that in the three lower categories combined after adjusting for age group and gender and the interaction between the two factors. Anemia was most pronounced in the 2-5 year olds males (55.5%, n=98). P. falciparum infection was not significantly associated with anemia. Stunting (body mass index [BMI] for age z-score<-2.00) was observed in 2.6% (2/78) of the 2-5 years olds and in 7.7% (14/182) in the 6-19 years age group. Lower BMI-z-scores (as continuous variable) were associated with anemia (p<0.05) while high intensity of S. haematobium infection was not significant when adjusting for age group and anemia. Participants with malaria infection had lower z-scores (as continuous variables) of weight and height for age. Lower height for age z-scores were also associated with anemia.

Conclusions: S. haematobium infection is likely to impact on child growth and possibly also anemia in all age groups and advocates for inclusion of whole populations into future control programes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume111
Issue4
Pages (from-to)144-153
Number of pages10
ISSN0035-9203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article, anemia, growth, morbidity, NTD, schistosomiasis, sub-Saharan Africa

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