Department of Political Science

Advice Not Safely Ignored: Professional Authority and the Strength of Legitimate Complexity

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Advice Not Safely Ignored : Professional Authority and the Strength of Legitimate Complexity. / Harrits, Gitte Sommer; Larsen, Lars Thorup.

In: Sociology, Vol. 55, No. 5, 10.2021, p. 1015-1034.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Harrits, Gitte Sommer ; Larsen, Lars Thorup. / Advice Not Safely Ignored : Professional Authority and the Strength of Legitimate Complexity. In: Sociology. 2021 ; Vol. 55, No. 5. pp. 1015-1034.

Bibtex

@article{dfe254c985474880b3052f979d61e573,
title = "Advice Not Safely Ignored: Professional Authority and the Strength of Legitimate Complexity",
abstract = "It is widely debated how ordinary citizens understand and use different types of knowledge and whether the authority of professional expertise is challenged by the spread of information. These debates underline that we know too little about how professional expertise is understood from the citizens{\textquoteright} point of view and how citizens decide whether or not to accept various types of expertise as authoritative. This article investigates professional authority understood as lay citizens{\textquoteright} willingness to follow certain types of professional advice. We argue that variation in professional authority can be explained by citizens{\textquoteright} evaluations of professional expertise and whether they perceive the tasks and problems addressed by professionals as having {\textquoteleft}legitimate complexity{\textquoteright}. The analysis uses survey data from two countries, including vignettes on following advice in concrete everyday situations. We find legitimate complexity to be a strong predictor of professional authority although social status also plays a role.",
keywords = "authority, doctors, legitimate complexity, professional authority, professions, quantitative methods, survey data, teachers, vignettes",
author = "Harrits, {Gitte Sommer} and Larsen, {Lars Thorup}",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1177/0038038521994029",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "1015--1034",
journal = "Sociology",
issn = "0038-0385",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Advice Not Safely Ignored

T2 - Professional Authority and the Strength of Legitimate Complexity

AU - Harrits, Gitte Sommer

AU - Larsen, Lars Thorup

PY - 2021/10

Y1 - 2021/10

N2 - It is widely debated how ordinary citizens understand and use different types of knowledge and whether the authority of professional expertise is challenged by the spread of information. These debates underline that we know too little about how professional expertise is understood from the citizens’ point of view and how citizens decide whether or not to accept various types of expertise as authoritative. This article investigates professional authority understood as lay citizens’ willingness to follow certain types of professional advice. We argue that variation in professional authority can be explained by citizens’ evaluations of professional expertise and whether they perceive the tasks and problems addressed by professionals as having ‘legitimate complexity’. The analysis uses survey data from two countries, including vignettes on following advice in concrete everyday situations. We find legitimate complexity to be a strong predictor of professional authority although social status also plays a role.

AB - It is widely debated how ordinary citizens understand and use different types of knowledge and whether the authority of professional expertise is challenged by the spread of information. These debates underline that we know too little about how professional expertise is understood from the citizens’ point of view and how citizens decide whether or not to accept various types of expertise as authoritative. This article investigates professional authority understood as lay citizens’ willingness to follow certain types of professional advice. We argue that variation in professional authority can be explained by citizens’ evaluations of professional expertise and whether they perceive the tasks and problems addressed by professionals as having ‘legitimate complexity’. The analysis uses survey data from two countries, including vignettes on following advice in concrete everyday situations. We find legitimate complexity to be a strong predictor of professional authority although social status also plays a role.

KW - authority

KW - doctors

KW - legitimate complexity

KW - professional authority

KW - professions

KW - quantitative methods

KW - survey data

KW - teachers

KW - vignettes

U2 - 10.1177/0038038521994029

DO - 10.1177/0038038521994029

M3 - Journal article

VL - 55

SP - 1015

EP - 1034

JO - Sociology

JF - Sociology

SN - 0038-0385

IS - 5

ER -