Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Anne-Claire Vergnaud
  • ,
  • Dora Romaguera
  • ,
  • Petra H Peeters
  • ,
  • Carla H van Gils
  • ,
  • Doris Sm Chan
  • ,
  • Isabelle Romieu
  • ,
  • Heinz Freisling
  • ,
  • Pietro Ferrari
  • ,
  • Françoise Clavel-Chapelon
  • ,
  • Guy Fagherazzi
  • ,
  • Laureen Dartois
  • ,
  • Kuanrong Li
  • ,
  • Kaja Tikk
  • ,
  • Manuela M Bergmann
  • ,
  • Heiner Boeing
  • ,
  • Anne Tjønneland
  • ,
  • Anja Olsen
  • Kim Overvad
  • Christina C Dahm
  • Maria Luisa Redondo
  • ,
  • Antonio Agudo
  • ,
  • María-José Sánchez
  • ,
  • Pilar Amiano
  • ,
  • María-Dolores Chirlaque
  • ,
  • Eva Ardanaz
  • ,
  • Kay-Tee Khaw
  • ,
  • Nick J Wareham
  • ,
  • Francesca Crowe
  • ,
  • Antonia Trichopoulou
  • ,
  • Philippos Orfanos
  • ,
  • Dimitrios Trichopoulos
  • ,
  • Giovanna Masala
  • ,
  • Sabina Sieri
  • ,
  • Rosario Tumino
  • ,
  • Paolo Vineis
  • ,
  • Salvatore Panico
  • ,
  • H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita
  • ,
  • Martine M Ros
  • ,
  • Anne May
  • ,
  • Elisabet Wirfält
  • ,
  • Emily Sonestedt
  • ,
  • Ingegerd Johansson
  • ,
  • Göran Hallmans
  • ,
  • Eiliv Lund
  • ,
  • Elisabete Weiderpass
  • ,
  • Christine L Parr
  • ,
  • Elio Riboli
  • ,
  • Teresa Norat
BACKGROUND: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether concordance with WCRF/AICR recommendations is related to risk of death. DESIGN: The current study included 378,864 participants from 9 European countries enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. At recruitment (1992-1998), dietary, anthropometric, and lifestyle information was collected. A WCRF/AICR score, which incorporated 6 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for men [regarding body fatness, physical activity, foods and drinks that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods, and alcoholic drinks (score range: 0-6)] and 7 WCRF/AICR recommendations for women [plus breastfeeding (score range: 0-7)], was constructed. Higher scores indicated greater concordance with WCRF/AICR recommendations. Associations between the WCRF/AICR score and risks of total and cause-specific death were estimated by using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: After a median follow-up time of 12.8 y, 23,828 deaths were identified. Participants within the highest category of the WCRF/AICR score (5-6 points in men; 6-7 points in women) had a 34% lower hazard of death (95% CI: 0.59, 0.75) compared with participants within the lowest category of the WCRF/AICR score (0-2 points in men; 0-3 points in women). Significant inverse associations were observed in all countries. The WCRF/AICR score was also significantly associated with a lower hazard of dying from cancer, circulatory disease, and respiratory disease. CONCLUSION: Results of this study suggest that following WCRF/AICR recommendations could significantly increase longevity.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume97
Issue5
Pages (from-to)1107-20
Number of pages14
ISSN0002-9165
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

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