A validation study of the CirCom comorbidity score in an English cirrhosis population using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

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DOI

  • Colin J Crooks, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
  • ,
  • Joe West, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
  • ,
  • Peter Jepsen

Purpose: The CirCom score has been developed from Danish data as a specific measure of comorbidity for cirrhosis to predict all-cause mortality. We compared its performance with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) in an English cirrhosis population.

Patients and methods: We used comorbidity scores in a survival model to predict mortality in a cirrhosis cohort in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. The discrimination of each score was compared by age, gender, socioeconomic status, cirrhosis etiology, cirrhosis stage, and year after cirrhosis diagnosis. We also measured their ability to predict liver-related versus non-liver-related death.

Results: There was a small improvement in the C statistic from the model using the CirCom score (C=0.63) compared to the CCI (C=0.62), and there was an overall improvement in the net reclassification index of 1.5%. The improvement was more notable in younger patients, those with an alcohol etiology, and those with compensated cirrhosis. Both scores performed better (C statistic >0.7) for non-liver-related deaths than liver-related deaths (C statistic <0.6), as comorbidity was only weakly predictive of liver-related death.

Conclusion: The CirCom score provided a small improvement in performance over the CCI in the prediction of all-cause and non-liver mortality, but not liver-related mortality. Therefore, it is important to include a measure of comorbidity in studies of cirrhosis survival, alongside a measure of cirrhosis severity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical epidemiology
Volume10
Pages (from-to)107-120
Number of pages14
ISSN1179-1349
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

    Research areas

  • Cause of death, Cirrhosis, Cohort, Comorbidity, Mortality, Prognosis

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