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A Gateway to Learning: "Modern Education" in the Monastery

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Standard

A Gateway to Learning : "Modern Education" in the Monastery. / Warner, Cameron David.

Educational transformations and avenues of learning: Anthropological perspectives on education in Nepal. ed. / Karen Valentin; Uma Pradhan. Oxford University Press, 2020.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Warner, CD 2020, A Gateway to Learning: "Modern Education" in the Monastery. in K Valentin & U Pradhan (eds), Educational transformations and avenues of learning: Anthropological perspectives on education in Nepal. Oxford University Press.

APA

Warner, C. D. (Accepted/In press). A Gateway to Learning: "Modern Education" in the Monastery. In K. Valentin, & U. Pradhan (Eds.), Educational transformations and avenues of learning: Anthropological perspectives on education in Nepal Oxford University Press.

CBE

Warner CD. 2020. A Gateway to Learning: "Modern Education" in the Monastery. Valentin K, Pradhan U, editors. In Educational transformations and avenues of learning: Anthropological perspectives on education in Nepal. Oxford University Press.

MLA

Warner, Cameron David "A Gateway to Learning: "Modern Education" in the Monastery". and Valentin, Karen Pradhan, Uma (editors). Educational transformations and avenues of learning: Anthropological perspectives on education in Nepal. Oxford University Press. 2020.

Vancouver

Warner CD. A Gateway to Learning: "Modern Education" in the Monastery. In Valentin K, Pradhan U, editors, Educational transformations and avenues of learning: Anthropological perspectives on education in Nepal. Oxford University Press. 2020

Author

Warner, Cameron David. / A Gateway to Learning : "Modern Education" in the Monastery. Educational transformations and avenues of learning: Anthropological perspectives on education in Nepal. editor / Karen Valentin ; Uma Pradhan. Oxford University Press, 2020.

Bibtex

@inbook{7d03a9c9e08d4e2eac56412040106c48,
title = "A Gateway to Learning: {"}Modern Education{"} in the Monastery",
abstract = "Demographic, migrational, and educational shifts in Nepal have placed tremendous pressure on monastic institutions in the Himalayan region, especially in Nepal. Increasingly, Himalayan families are opting to have fewer children. At the same time, those families are spending more time each year in Kathmandu or migrating out of Nepal, instead of residing in their high Himalayan villages. Concomitantly, the increasing number of secular schools and secular job opportunities, both in rural districts and Kathmandu, have resulted in families from high altitude districts choosing government and private schools over sending their sons and daughters to be ordained as Buddhist monks and nuns. However, some monasteries have responded to these pressures through reforming their curricula to provide a secular education alongside monastic training. I focus here on one such {"}monastic institute{"} in the Pokhara region in which officials expect that a high percentage of school-age boys who enter the monastery will leave as young adults and engage in secular work. In response to these pressures, this monastic institute provides a modern education alongside contemporary monastic training. From the point of view of monastic officials, what is the value of being trained in a monastery to work in secular vocations? How does the monastic institute work with local secular schools to define a modern education for Himalayan children? This research has implications for ascertaining the future development of the educational sector in the Himalayas as well as the future of institutionalized Himalayan Buddhism writ large.",
keywords = "Nepal, Buddhism, Demographic change, transnational",
author = "Warner, {Cameron David}",
year = "2020",
language = "English",
editor = "Karen Valentin and Uma Pradhan",
booktitle = "Educational transformations and avenues of learning",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - A Gateway to Learning

T2 - "Modern Education" in the Monastery

AU - Warner, Cameron David

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Demographic, migrational, and educational shifts in Nepal have placed tremendous pressure on monastic institutions in the Himalayan region, especially in Nepal. Increasingly, Himalayan families are opting to have fewer children. At the same time, those families are spending more time each year in Kathmandu or migrating out of Nepal, instead of residing in their high Himalayan villages. Concomitantly, the increasing number of secular schools and secular job opportunities, both in rural districts and Kathmandu, have resulted in families from high altitude districts choosing government and private schools over sending their sons and daughters to be ordained as Buddhist monks and nuns. However, some monasteries have responded to these pressures through reforming their curricula to provide a secular education alongside monastic training. I focus here on one such "monastic institute" in the Pokhara region in which officials expect that a high percentage of school-age boys who enter the monastery will leave as young adults and engage in secular work. In response to these pressures, this monastic institute provides a modern education alongside contemporary monastic training. From the point of view of monastic officials, what is the value of being trained in a monastery to work in secular vocations? How does the monastic institute work with local secular schools to define a modern education for Himalayan children? This research has implications for ascertaining the future development of the educational sector in the Himalayas as well as the future of institutionalized Himalayan Buddhism writ large.

AB - Demographic, migrational, and educational shifts in Nepal have placed tremendous pressure on monastic institutions in the Himalayan region, especially in Nepal. Increasingly, Himalayan families are opting to have fewer children. At the same time, those families are spending more time each year in Kathmandu or migrating out of Nepal, instead of residing in their high Himalayan villages. Concomitantly, the increasing number of secular schools and secular job opportunities, both in rural districts and Kathmandu, have resulted in families from high altitude districts choosing government and private schools over sending their sons and daughters to be ordained as Buddhist monks and nuns. However, some monasteries have responded to these pressures through reforming their curricula to provide a secular education alongside monastic training. I focus here on one such "monastic institute" in the Pokhara region in which officials expect that a high percentage of school-age boys who enter the monastery will leave as young adults and engage in secular work. In response to these pressures, this monastic institute provides a modern education alongside contemporary monastic training. From the point of view of monastic officials, what is the value of being trained in a monastery to work in secular vocations? How does the monastic institute work with local secular schools to define a modern education for Himalayan children? This research has implications for ascertaining the future development of the educational sector in the Himalayas as well as the future of institutionalized Himalayan Buddhism writ large.

KW - Nepal

KW - Buddhism

KW - Demographic change

KW - transnational

M3 - Book chapter

BT - Educational transformations and avenues of learning

A2 - Valentin, Karen

A2 - Pradhan, Uma

PB - Oxford University Press

ER -