'A Farmer, a Place and at least 20 Members': The Development of Artifact Ecologies in Volunteer-based Communities.

Susanne Bødker, Henrik Korsgaard, Joanna Saad-Sulonen

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, we present a case study of an urban organic food community and examine the way the community shapes its artifact ecology through a combination of appropriation of freely or cheaply available tools, and the long-term effort of building the community's own website. Based on participatory observation, content analysis of communication documents, and a series of interviews, we see how the collection of artifacts that a community uses to support their practice form what we refer to as their community artifact ecology. A community artifact ecology is multifaceted, dynamic and pending on what the members bring to the table, as well as on particular situations of use. The community artifact ecology concept is important for CSCW as it enables framing of the relationship between communities and technologies beyond the single artifact and beyond a static view of a dedicated technology.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2016
Number of pages15
Place of publicationCalifornia, USA
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Publication date2016
Pages1142-1156
ISBN (Print)978-1-4503-3592-8
ISBN (Electronic)9781450335928
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventThe 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing - San Francisco, United States
Duration: 27 Feb 20162 Mar 2016

Conference

ConferenceThe 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period27/02/201602/03/2016

Keywords

  • Community
  • artifact ecology
  • volunteering

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