Department of Economics and Business Economics

A double-blind randomized pilot trial comparing computerized cognitive exercises to Tetris in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

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  • Aida Bikic, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
  • Torben Østergaard Christensen, c Clinical Social Medicine & Rehabilitation , Hospital Unit West , Aarhus , Denmark.
  • ,
  • James F. Leckman, Yale School of Medicine, United States
  • Niels Bilenberg, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
  • Søren Dalsgaard

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this trial was to examine the feasibility and efficacy of computerized cognitive exercises from Scientific Brain Training (SBT), compared to the computer game Tetris as an active placebo, in a pilot study of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

METHOD: Eighteen adolescents with ADHD were randomized to treatment or control intervention for 7 weeks. Outcome measures were cognitive test, symptom, and motivation questionnaires.

RESULTS: SBT and Tetris were feasible as home-based interventions, and participants' compliance was high, but participants perceived both interventions as not very interesting or helpful. There were no significant group differences on cognitive and ADHD-symptom measures after intervention. Pre-post intra-group measurement showed that the SBT had a significant beneficial effect on sustained attention, while the active placebo had significant beneficial effects on working memory, both with large effect sizes.

CONCLUSION: Although no significant differences were found between groups on any measure, there were significant intra-group changes for each group.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNordic Journal of Psychiatry
Volume71
Issue6
Pages (from-to)455-464
Number of pages9
ISSN0803-9488
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

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