Department of Political Science

A collaboratively derived international research agenda on legislative science advice

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Karen Akerlof, George Mason University
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  • Chris Tyler, UCL
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  • Sarah Elizabeth Foxen, UCL
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  • Erin Heath, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
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  • Marga Gual Soler, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
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  • Alessandro Allegra, UCL
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  • Emily T. Cloyd, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
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  • John A. Hird, University of Massachusetts Amherst
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  • Selena M. Nelson, George Mason University
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  • Christina T. Nguyen, George Mason University
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  • Cameryn J. Gonnella
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  • Liam A. Berigan, Kansas State University
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  • Carlos R. Abeledo, Universidad de Buenos Aires
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  • Tamara Adel Al-Yakoub, Yarmouk University
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  • Harris Francis Andoh, Tshwane University of Technology
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  • Laura dos Santos Boeira, Veredas Institute
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  • Pieter van Boheemen, Rathenau Instituut
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  • Paul Cairney, University of Stirling
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  • Robert Cook-Deegan, Arizona State University
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  • Gavin Costigan, Foundation for Science and Technology
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  • Meghnath Dhimal, Nepal Health Research Council
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  • Martín Hernán Di Marco, Gino Germani Research Institute
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  • Donatus Dube, National University of Science and Technology Bulawayo
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  • Abiodun Egbetokun, National Centre for Technology Management
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  • Jauad El Kharraz, Middle East Desalination Research Center (MEDRC)
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  • Liliana Estrada Galindo, INCyTU-Foro Consultivo Científico y Tecnológico
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  • Mark W. J. Ferguson, Science Foundation Ireland
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  • José Franco, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
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  • Zach Graves, Lincoln Network
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  • Emily Hayter, International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications (INASP)
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  • Alma Cristal Hernández-Mondragón, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV-IPN)
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  • Abbi D. Hobbs, UCL
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  • Kerry L. Holden, University of London
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  • Carel IJsselmuiden, Council on Health Research for Development (COHRED), University of KwaZulu-Natal
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  • Ayodele Samuel Jegede, University of Ibadan
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  • Snezana B. Krstic
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  • Jean-Marie Mbonyintwali, IntraHealth International
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  • Sisay Derso Mengesha, Ethiopian Public Health Institute
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  • Tomas Michalek, Comenius University in Bratislava
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  • Hiroshi Nagano, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
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  • Michael Nentwich, Institute of Technology Assessment (ITA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (OAW)
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  • Ali Nouri, Federation of American Scientists
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  • Peter Dithan Ntale, Makerere University Business School
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  • Olusegun M. Ogundele, Nigeria (Science Policy) Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services
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  • Jude Tochukwu Omenma, University of Johannesburg, University of Nigeria
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  • Louis-François Pau, Copenhagen Business School
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  • Jon M. Peha, Carnegie Mellon University
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  • Elizabeth M. Prescott, Georgetown University
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  • Irene Ramos-Vielba
  • Raimundo Roberts, National Library of Congress
The quantity and complexity of scientific and technological information provided to policymakers have been on the rise for decades. Yet little is known about how to provide science advice to legislatures, even though scientific information is widely acknowledged as valuable for decision-making in many policy domains. We asked academics, science advisers, and policymakers from both developed and developing nations to identify, review and refine, and then rank the most pressing research questions on legislative science advice (LSA). Experts generally agree that the state of evidence is poor, especially regarding developing and lower-middle income countries. Many fundamental questions about science advice processes remain unanswered and are of great interest: whether legislative use of scientific evidence improves the implementation and outcome of social programs and policies; under what conditions legislators and staff seek out scientific information or use what is presented to them; and how different communication channels affect informational trust and use. Environment and health are the highest priority policy domains for the field. The context-specific nature of many of the submitted questions—whether to policy issues, institutions, or locations—suggests one of the significant challenges is aggregating generalizable evidence on LSA practices. Understanding these research needs represents a first step in advancing a global agenda for LSA research.
Original languageEnglish
Article number108
JournalPalgrave Communications
Volume5
Issue1
Number of pages13
ISSN2055-1045
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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