Vladimir Matchkov

Association between endothelial dysfunction and depression-like symptoms in chronic mild stress model of depression

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Association between endothelial dysfunction and depression-like symptoms in chronic mild stress model of depression. / Bouzinova, Elena; Bødtkjer, Donna Marie Briggs; Kudryavtseva, Olga; Wiborg, Ove; Aalkjær, Christian; Matchkov, Vladimir.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 76, No. 4, 2014, p. 268-76.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{818fb6aaa7204f9c9053d577c61357a3,
title = "Association between endothelial dysfunction and depression-like symptoms in chronic mild stress model of depression",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular diseases have high comorbidity with major depression. Endothelial dysfunction may explain the adverse cardiovascular outcome in depression; therefore, we analyzed it in vitro. In the chronic mild stress model, some rats develop depression-like symptoms (including {"}anhedonia{"}), whereas others are stress resilient.METHODS: After 8 weeks of chronic mild stress, anhedonic rats reduced their sucrose intake by 55% (7%), whereas resilient rats did not. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation of norepinephrine-preconstricted mesenteric arteries was analyzed in nonstressed, anhedonic, and resilient rat groups.RESULTS: Small resistance arteries from anhedonic rats were less sensitive to acetylcholine than those of the nonstressed and resilient groups (p = .029). Pathways of endothelium-dependent relaxation were altered in arteries from anhedonic rats. Nitric oxide (NO)-dependent relaxation and endothelial NO synthase expression were increased in arteries from anhedonic rats (0.235 [0.039] arbitrary units and 155.7% [8.15%]) compared with the nonstressed (0.135 [0.012] arbitrary units and 100.0% [8.08%]) and resilient (0.152 [0.018] arbitrary units and 108.1% [11.65%]) groups (p < .001 and p = .002, respectively). Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity revealed increased COX-2-dependent relaxation in the anhedonic group. In contrast, endothelial NO synthase- and COX-independent relaxation to acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-like response) was reduced in anhedonic rats (p < .001). This was associated with decreased transcription of intermediate-conductance Ca-activated K channels.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that depression-like symptoms are associated with reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation due to suppressed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-like relaxation despite up-regulation of the NO and COX-2-dependent pathways in rat mesenteric arteries. These changes could affect peripheral resistance and organ perfusion in major depression.",
keywords = "endothelial dysfunction, animalmodel, depression, stress",
author = "Elena Bouzinova and B{\o}dtkjer, {Donna Marie Briggs} and Olga Kudryavtseva and Ove Wiborg and Christian Aalkj{\ae}r and Vladimir Matchkov",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "76",
pages = "268--76",
journal = "Psychosomatic Medicine",
issn = "0033-3174",
publisher = "LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between endothelial dysfunction and depression-like symptoms in chronic mild stress model of depression

AU - Bouzinova, Elena

AU - Bødtkjer, Donna Marie Briggs

AU - Kudryavtseva, Olga

AU - Wiborg, Ove

AU - Aalkjær, Christian

AU - Matchkov, Vladimir

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular diseases have high comorbidity with major depression. Endothelial dysfunction may explain the adverse cardiovascular outcome in depression; therefore, we analyzed it in vitro. In the chronic mild stress model, some rats develop depression-like symptoms (including "anhedonia"), whereas others are stress resilient.METHODS: After 8 weeks of chronic mild stress, anhedonic rats reduced their sucrose intake by 55% (7%), whereas resilient rats did not. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation of norepinephrine-preconstricted mesenteric arteries was analyzed in nonstressed, anhedonic, and resilient rat groups.RESULTS: Small resistance arteries from anhedonic rats were less sensitive to acetylcholine than those of the nonstressed and resilient groups (p = .029). Pathways of endothelium-dependent relaxation were altered in arteries from anhedonic rats. Nitric oxide (NO)-dependent relaxation and endothelial NO synthase expression were increased in arteries from anhedonic rats (0.235 [0.039] arbitrary units and 155.7% [8.15%]) compared with the nonstressed (0.135 [0.012] arbitrary units and 100.0% [8.08%]) and resilient (0.152 [0.018] arbitrary units and 108.1% [11.65%]) groups (p < .001 and p = .002, respectively). Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity revealed increased COX-2-dependent relaxation in the anhedonic group. In contrast, endothelial NO synthase- and COX-independent relaxation to acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-like response) was reduced in anhedonic rats (p < .001). This was associated with decreased transcription of intermediate-conductance Ca-activated K channels.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that depression-like symptoms are associated with reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation due to suppressed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-like relaxation despite up-regulation of the NO and COX-2-dependent pathways in rat mesenteric arteries. These changes could affect peripheral resistance and organ perfusion in major depression.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular diseases have high comorbidity with major depression. Endothelial dysfunction may explain the adverse cardiovascular outcome in depression; therefore, we analyzed it in vitro. In the chronic mild stress model, some rats develop depression-like symptoms (including "anhedonia"), whereas others are stress resilient.METHODS: After 8 weeks of chronic mild stress, anhedonic rats reduced their sucrose intake by 55% (7%), whereas resilient rats did not. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation of norepinephrine-preconstricted mesenteric arteries was analyzed in nonstressed, anhedonic, and resilient rat groups.RESULTS: Small resistance arteries from anhedonic rats were less sensitive to acetylcholine than those of the nonstressed and resilient groups (p = .029). Pathways of endothelium-dependent relaxation were altered in arteries from anhedonic rats. Nitric oxide (NO)-dependent relaxation and endothelial NO synthase expression were increased in arteries from anhedonic rats (0.235 [0.039] arbitrary units and 155.7% [8.15%]) compared with the nonstressed (0.135 [0.012] arbitrary units and 100.0% [8.08%]) and resilient (0.152 [0.018] arbitrary units and 108.1% [11.65%]) groups (p < .001 and p = .002, respectively). Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity revealed increased COX-2-dependent relaxation in the anhedonic group. In contrast, endothelial NO synthase- and COX-independent relaxation to acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-like response) was reduced in anhedonic rats (p < .001). This was associated with decreased transcription of intermediate-conductance Ca-activated K channels.CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that depression-like symptoms are associated with reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation due to suppressed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-like relaxation despite up-regulation of the NO and COX-2-dependent pathways in rat mesenteric arteries. These changes could affect peripheral resistance and organ perfusion in major depression.

KW - endothelial dysfunction, animalmodel, depression, stress

M3 - Journal article

VL - 76

SP - 268

EP - 276

JO - Psychosomatic Medicine

JF - Psychosomatic Medicine

SN - 0033-3174

IS - 4

ER -