Thomas Kjær Christensen

Crowded skies: Conflicts between expanding goose populations and aviation safety

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We here review the collision risks posed by large-bodied, flocking geese to aircraft, exacerbated by recent major increases in northern hemisphere goose populations and air traffic volume. Mitigation of goose–aircraft strike risks requires knowledge of local goose movements, global goose population dynamics and ecology. Airports can minimise goose strikes by managing habitats within the airport property, applying deterrents to scare geese away and lethal control, but goose migration and movements at greater spatial scales present greater challenges. Habitat management outside of airports can locally reduce goose attractiveness of peripheral areas, but requires stakeholder involvement and coordination. Information on bird strike rates, individual goose movements and goose population dynamics is essential to understand how best to reduce the risk of goose strikes. Avian radar provides tactical information for mitigation measures and strategic data on local patterns of goose migration and habitat use. In the face of expanding air traffic, goose distributions and populations, these threats need to be integrated with other local, national and international stakeholder involvement to secure viable solutions to multiple conflicts.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmbio
Volume46
IssueSuppl 2
Pages (from-to)290-300
Number of pages11
ISSN0044-7447
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2017

    Research areas

  • Aircraft, Airport, Bird strike, Geese, Population increase, ACTIVATED-CHARCOAL, AIRCRAFT, STORMWATER, AIRPORTS, HUNTING DISTURBANCE, PREFERENCES, WILDLIFE, BRANTA-CANADENSIS, CANADA GEESE, REDUCE, Animal Distribution, Accidents, Aviation/statistics & numerical data, Animals, Ecosystem, Geese/physiology, Conservation of Natural Resources, Population Dynamics

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ID: 109758379