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Sussie Antonsen

Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study

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Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study. / Roberts, Christine L; Ford, Jane B; Algert, Charles S; Antonsen, Sussie; Chalmers, James; Cnattingius, Sven; Gokhale, Manjusha; Kotelchuck, Milton; Melve, Kari K; Langridge, Amanda; Morris, Carole; Morris, Jonathan M; Nassar, Natasha; Norman, Jane E; Norrie, John; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Walker, Robin; Weir, Christopher J.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2011, p. e000101.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Roberts, CL, Ford, JB, Algert, CS, Antonsen, S, Chalmers, J, Cnattingius, S, Gokhale, M, Kotelchuck, M, Melve, KK, Langridge, A, Morris, C, Morris, JM, Nassar, N, Norman, JE, Norrie, J, Sørensen, HT, Walker, R & Weir, CJ 2011, 'Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study', BMJ Open, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. e000101. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000101

APA

Roberts, C. L., Ford, J. B., Algert, C. S., Antonsen, S., Chalmers, J., Cnattingius, S., ... Weir, C. J. (2011). Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study. BMJ Open, 1(1), e000101. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000101

CBE

Roberts CL, Ford JB, Algert CS, Antonsen S, Chalmers J, Cnattingius S, Gokhale M, Kotelchuck M, Melve KK, Langridge A, Morris C, Morris JM, Nassar N, Norman JE, Norrie J, Sørensen HT, Walker R, Weir CJ. 2011. Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study. BMJ Open. 1(1):e000101. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000101

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Roberts, Christine L ; Ford, Jane B ; Algert, Charles S ; Antonsen, Sussie ; Chalmers, James ; Cnattingius, Sven ; Gokhale, Manjusha ; Kotelchuck, Milton ; Melve, Kari K ; Langridge, Amanda ; Morris, Carole ; Morris, Jonathan M ; Nassar, Natasha ; Norman, Jane E ; Norrie, John ; Sørensen, Henrik Toft ; Walker, Robin ; Weir, Christopher J. / Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study. In: BMJ Open. 2011 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. e000101.

Bibtex

@article{b34bd4da2d6a42249d9971f252d5baf3,
title = "Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study",
abstract = "Objective The objective of this study was to compare international trends in pre-eclampsia rates and in overall pregnancy hypertension rates (including gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia). Design Population data (from birth and/or hospital records) on all women giving birth were available from Australia (two states), Canada (Alberta), Denmark, Norway, Scotland, Sweden and the USA (Massachusetts) for a minimum of 6 years from 1997 to 2007. All countries used the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, except Massachusetts which used the 9th revision. There were no major changes to the diagnostic criteria or methods of data collection in any country during the study period. Population characteristics as well as rates of pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia were compared. Results Absolute rates varied across the populations as follows: pregnancy hypertension (3.6{\%} to 9.1{\%}), pre-eclampsia (1.4{\%} to 4.0{\%}) and early-onset pre-eclampsia (0.3{\%} to 0.7{\%}). Pregnancy hypertension and/or pre-eclampsia rates declined over time in most populations. This was unexpected given that factors associated with pregnancy hypertension such as pre-pregnancy obesity and maternal age are generally increasing. However, there was also a downward shift in gestational age with fewer pregnancies reaching 40 weeks. Conclusion The rate of pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia decreased in northern Europe and Australia from 1997 to 2007, but increased in Massachusetts. The use of a different International Classification of Diseases coding version in Massachusetts may contribute to the difference in trend. Elective delivery prior to the due date is the most likely explanation for the decrease observed in Europe and Australia. Also, the use of interventions that reduce the risk of pregnancy hypertension and/or progression to pre-eclampsia (low-dose aspirin, calcium supplementation and early delivery for mild hypertension) may have contributed to the decline.",
author = "Roberts, {Christine L} and Ford, {Jane B} and Algert, {Charles S} and Sussie Antonsen and James Chalmers and Sven Cnattingius and Manjusha Gokhale and Milton Kotelchuck and Melve, {Kari K} and Amanda Langridge and Carole Morris and Morris, {Jonathan M} and Natasha Nassar and Norman, {Jane E} and John Norrie and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik Toft} and Robin Walker and Weir, {Christopher J}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000101",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "e000101",
journal = "B M J Open",
issn = "2044-6055",
publisher = "BMJ Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Population-based trends in pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia: an international comparative study

AU - Roberts, Christine L

AU - Ford, Jane B

AU - Algert, Charles S

AU - Antonsen, Sussie

AU - Chalmers, James

AU - Cnattingius, Sven

AU - Gokhale, Manjusha

AU - Kotelchuck, Milton

AU - Melve, Kari K

AU - Langridge, Amanda

AU - Morris, Carole

AU - Morris, Jonathan M

AU - Nassar, Natasha

AU - Norman, Jane E

AU - Norrie, John

AU - Sørensen, Henrik Toft

AU - Walker, Robin

AU - Weir, Christopher J

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Objective The objective of this study was to compare international trends in pre-eclampsia rates and in overall pregnancy hypertension rates (including gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia). Design Population data (from birth and/or hospital records) on all women giving birth were available from Australia (two states), Canada (Alberta), Denmark, Norway, Scotland, Sweden and the USA (Massachusetts) for a minimum of 6 years from 1997 to 2007. All countries used the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, except Massachusetts which used the 9th revision. There were no major changes to the diagnostic criteria or methods of data collection in any country during the study period. Population characteristics as well as rates of pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia were compared. Results Absolute rates varied across the populations as follows: pregnancy hypertension (3.6% to 9.1%), pre-eclampsia (1.4% to 4.0%) and early-onset pre-eclampsia (0.3% to 0.7%). Pregnancy hypertension and/or pre-eclampsia rates declined over time in most populations. This was unexpected given that factors associated with pregnancy hypertension such as pre-pregnancy obesity and maternal age are generally increasing. However, there was also a downward shift in gestational age with fewer pregnancies reaching 40 weeks. Conclusion The rate of pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia decreased in northern Europe and Australia from 1997 to 2007, but increased in Massachusetts. The use of a different International Classification of Diseases coding version in Massachusetts may contribute to the difference in trend. Elective delivery prior to the due date is the most likely explanation for the decrease observed in Europe and Australia. Also, the use of interventions that reduce the risk of pregnancy hypertension and/or progression to pre-eclampsia (low-dose aspirin, calcium supplementation and early delivery for mild hypertension) may have contributed to the decline.

AB - Objective The objective of this study was to compare international trends in pre-eclampsia rates and in overall pregnancy hypertension rates (including gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia). Design Population data (from birth and/or hospital records) on all women giving birth were available from Australia (two states), Canada (Alberta), Denmark, Norway, Scotland, Sweden and the USA (Massachusetts) for a minimum of 6 years from 1997 to 2007. All countries used the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, except Massachusetts which used the 9th revision. There were no major changes to the diagnostic criteria or methods of data collection in any country during the study period. Population characteristics as well as rates of pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia were compared. Results Absolute rates varied across the populations as follows: pregnancy hypertension (3.6% to 9.1%), pre-eclampsia (1.4% to 4.0%) and early-onset pre-eclampsia (0.3% to 0.7%). Pregnancy hypertension and/or pre-eclampsia rates declined over time in most populations. This was unexpected given that factors associated with pregnancy hypertension such as pre-pregnancy obesity and maternal age are generally increasing. However, there was also a downward shift in gestational age with fewer pregnancies reaching 40 weeks. Conclusion The rate of pregnancy hypertension and pre-eclampsia decreased in northern Europe and Australia from 1997 to 2007, but increased in Massachusetts. The use of a different International Classification of Diseases coding version in Massachusetts may contribute to the difference in trend. Elective delivery prior to the due date is the most likely explanation for the decrease observed in Europe and Australia. Also, the use of interventions that reduce the risk of pregnancy hypertension and/or progression to pre-eclampsia (low-dose aspirin, calcium supplementation and early delivery for mild hypertension) may have contributed to the decline.

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000101

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000101

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22021762

VL - 1

SP - e000101

JO - B M J Open

JF - B M J Open

SN - 2044-6055

IS - 1

ER -