Department of Economics and Business Economics

Sussie Antonsen

Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care: a national cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care : a national cohort study. / Walter, Florian; Carr, Matthew J; Mok, Pearl L H; Antonsen, Sussie; Pedersen, Carsten B; Appleby, Louis; Fazel, Seena; Shaw, Jenny; Webb, Roger T.

In: The Lancet Psychiatry, Vol. 6, 07.2019, p. 582-589.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Walter, F, Carr, MJ, Mok, PLH, Antonsen, S, Pedersen, CB, Appleby, L, Fazel, S, Shaw, J & Webb, RT 2019, 'Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care: a national cohort study', The Lancet Psychiatry, vol. 6, pp. 582-589. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(19)30180-4

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Walter, Florian ; Carr, Matthew J ; Mok, Pearl L H ; Antonsen, Sussie ; Pedersen, Carsten B ; Appleby, Louis ; Fazel, Seena ; Shaw, Jenny ; Webb, Roger T. / Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care : a national cohort study. In: The Lancet Psychiatry. 2019 ; Vol. 6. pp. 582-589.

Bibtex

@article{8f6e76d8f3bc40fa9b30db5b3f509d23,
title = "Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care: a national cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Discharged psychiatric inpatients are at elevated risk of serious adverse outcomes, but no previous study has comprehensively examined an array of multiple risks in a single cohort.METHODS: We used data from the Danish Civil Registration System to delineate a cohort of all individuals born in Denmark in 1967-2000, who were alive and residing in Denmark on their 15th birthday, and who had been discharged from their first inpatient psychiatric episode at age 15 years or older. Each individual in the discharged cohort was matched on age and sex with 25 comparators without a history of psychiatric admission. Data linked to each individual were also obtained from the Psychiatric Central Research Register, Register of Causes of Death, National Patient Register, and the National Crime Register. We used survival analysis techniques to estimate absolute and relative risks of all-cause mortality, suicide, accidental death, homicide victimisation, homicide perpetration, non-fatal self-harm, violent criminality, and hospitalisation following violence, until Dec 31, 2015.FINDINGS: We included 62 922 individuals in the discharged cohort, and 1 573 050 matched comparators. Risks for each of all eight outcomes examined were markedly elevated in the discharged cohort relative to the comparators. Within 10 years of first discharge, the cumulative incidence of death, self-harm, committing a violent crime, or hospitalisation due to interpersonal violence was 32·0{\%} (95{\%} CI 31·6-32·5) in the discharged cohort (37·1{\%} [36·5-37·8] in men and 27·2{\%} [26·7-27·8] in women). Absolute risk of at least one adverse outcome occurring within this timeframe were highest in people diagnosed with a psychoactive substance use disorder at first discharge (cumulative incidence 49·4{\%} [48·4-50·4]), and lowest in those diagnosed with a mood disorder (24·4{\%} [23·6-25·2]). For suicide and non-fatal self-harm, risks were especially high during the first 3 months post-discharge, whereas risks for accidental death, violent criminality, and hospitalisation due to violence were more constant throughout the 10-year follow-up.INTERPRETATION: People discharged from inpatient psychiatric care are at higher risk than the rest of the population for a range of serious fatal and non-fatal adverse outcomes. Improved inter-agency liaison, intensive follow-up immediately after discharge, and longer-term social support are indicated.FUNDING: Medical Research Council, European Research Council, and Wellcome Trust.",
author = "Florian Walter and Carr, {Matthew J} and Mok, {Pearl L H} and Sussie Antonsen and Pedersen, {Carsten B} and Louis Appleby and Seena Fazel and Jenny Shaw and Webb, {Roger T}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/S2215-0366(19)30180-4",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "582--589",
journal = "The Lancet Psychiatry",
issn = "2215-0366",
publisher = "TheLancet Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multiple adverse outcomes following first discharge from inpatient psychiatric care

T2 - a national cohort study

AU - Walter, Florian

AU - Carr, Matthew J

AU - Mok, Pearl L H

AU - Antonsen, Sussie

AU - Pedersen, Carsten B

AU - Appleby, Louis

AU - Fazel, Seena

AU - Shaw, Jenny

AU - Webb, Roger T

N1 - Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - BACKGROUND: Discharged psychiatric inpatients are at elevated risk of serious adverse outcomes, but no previous study has comprehensively examined an array of multiple risks in a single cohort.METHODS: We used data from the Danish Civil Registration System to delineate a cohort of all individuals born in Denmark in 1967-2000, who were alive and residing in Denmark on their 15th birthday, and who had been discharged from their first inpatient psychiatric episode at age 15 years or older. Each individual in the discharged cohort was matched on age and sex with 25 comparators without a history of psychiatric admission. Data linked to each individual were also obtained from the Psychiatric Central Research Register, Register of Causes of Death, National Patient Register, and the National Crime Register. We used survival analysis techniques to estimate absolute and relative risks of all-cause mortality, suicide, accidental death, homicide victimisation, homicide perpetration, non-fatal self-harm, violent criminality, and hospitalisation following violence, until Dec 31, 2015.FINDINGS: We included 62 922 individuals in the discharged cohort, and 1 573 050 matched comparators. Risks for each of all eight outcomes examined were markedly elevated in the discharged cohort relative to the comparators. Within 10 years of first discharge, the cumulative incidence of death, self-harm, committing a violent crime, or hospitalisation due to interpersonal violence was 32·0% (95% CI 31·6-32·5) in the discharged cohort (37·1% [36·5-37·8] in men and 27·2% [26·7-27·8] in women). Absolute risk of at least one adverse outcome occurring within this timeframe were highest in people diagnosed with a psychoactive substance use disorder at first discharge (cumulative incidence 49·4% [48·4-50·4]), and lowest in those diagnosed with a mood disorder (24·4% [23·6-25·2]). For suicide and non-fatal self-harm, risks were especially high during the first 3 months post-discharge, whereas risks for accidental death, violent criminality, and hospitalisation due to violence were more constant throughout the 10-year follow-up.INTERPRETATION: People discharged from inpatient psychiatric care are at higher risk than the rest of the population for a range of serious fatal and non-fatal adverse outcomes. Improved inter-agency liaison, intensive follow-up immediately after discharge, and longer-term social support are indicated.FUNDING: Medical Research Council, European Research Council, and Wellcome Trust.

AB - BACKGROUND: Discharged psychiatric inpatients are at elevated risk of serious adverse outcomes, but no previous study has comprehensively examined an array of multiple risks in a single cohort.METHODS: We used data from the Danish Civil Registration System to delineate a cohort of all individuals born in Denmark in 1967-2000, who were alive and residing in Denmark on their 15th birthday, and who had been discharged from their first inpatient psychiatric episode at age 15 years or older. Each individual in the discharged cohort was matched on age and sex with 25 comparators without a history of psychiatric admission. Data linked to each individual were also obtained from the Psychiatric Central Research Register, Register of Causes of Death, National Patient Register, and the National Crime Register. We used survival analysis techniques to estimate absolute and relative risks of all-cause mortality, suicide, accidental death, homicide victimisation, homicide perpetration, non-fatal self-harm, violent criminality, and hospitalisation following violence, until Dec 31, 2015.FINDINGS: We included 62 922 individuals in the discharged cohort, and 1 573 050 matched comparators. Risks for each of all eight outcomes examined were markedly elevated in the discharged cohort relative to the comparators. Within 10 years of first discharge, the cumulative incidence of death, self-harm, committing a violent crime, or hospitalisation due to interpersonal violence was 32·0% (95% CI 31·6-32·5) in the discharged cohort (37·1% [36·5-37·8] in men and 27·2% [26·7-27·8] in women). Absolute risk of at least one adverse outcome occurring within this timeframe were highest in people diagnosed with a psychoactive substance use disorder at first discharge (cumulative incidence 49·4% [48·4-50·4]), and lowest in those diagnosed with a mood disorder (24·4% [23·6-25·2]). For suicide and non-fatal self-harm, risks were especially high during the first 3 months post-discharge, whereas risks for accidental death, violent criminality, and hospitalisation due to violence were more constant throughout the 10-year follow-up.INTERPRETATION: People discharged from inpatient psychiatric care are at higher risk than the rest of the population for a range of serious fatal and non-fatal adverse outcomes. Improved inter-agency liaison, intensive follow-up immediately after discharge, and longer-term social support are indicated.FUNDING: Medical Research Council, European Research Council, and Wellcome Trust.

U2 - 10.1016/S2215-0366(19)30180-4

DO - 10.1016/S2215-0366(19)30180-4

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31171451

VL - 6

SP - 582

EP - 589

JO - The Lancet Psychiatry

JF - The Lancet Psychiatry

SN - 2215-0366

ER -