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Susanne Bødker

Tying Knots: Participatory Infrastructuring at Work

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Tying Knots : Participatory Infrastructuring at Work. / Bødker, Susanne; Dindler, Christian; Iversen, Ole Sejer.

In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Vol. 26, No. 1-2, 29.01.2017, p. 245-273.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Author

Bødker, Susanne ; Dindler, Christian ; Iversen, Ole Sejer. / Tying Knots : Participatory Infrastructuring at Work. In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 1-2. pp. 245-273.

Bibtex

@article{b58dcb86227d4467bf98ff88cefff914,
title = "Tying Knots: Participatory Infrastructuring at Work",
abstract = "Today, most design projects are infrastructuring projects, because they build on technologies, competencies and practices that already exist. While infrastructuring was originally seen as being full of conflicts and contradictions with what is already present, we find that many contemporary reports seem to mainly address participatory infrastructuring as horizontal co-design and local, mutual learning processes in which people attempt to make the most out of available technology.In this paper we expand our view of design activities in three dimensions: First, how participatory processes play out vertically in different political and practical arenas; second, on the back stage of design, the messy activities that occur before, between and after the participatory workshops. And third, on their reach; how they tie into existing networks across organizations, and how agency and initiatives become dispersed within these networks. To illustrate and discuss the process of participatory infrastructuring we use a case study from an educational context. This particular project contains a diverse set of design activities at many organizational levels revolving around technology, decision-making, competence-building, commitment and policy-making. The project highlights these complexities, and our discussions lead to a vocabulary for participatory infrastructuring that focuses on knotworking, rather than structure, and on both horizontal and vertical reach and sustainability. This vocabulary is grounded in the meeting of the literature on infrastructuring, participatory design, and activity theory, and leads to a revised understanding of, for example, learning and conflicts in participatory infrastructuring.",
author = "Susanne B{\o}dker and Christian Dindler and Iversen, {Ole Sejer}",
year = "2017",
month = jan,
day = "29",
doi = "10.1007/s10606-017-9268-y",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "245--273",
journal = "Computer Supported Cooperative Work",
issn = "0925-9724",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1-2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tying Knots

T2 - Participatory Infrastructuring at Work

AU - Bødker, Susanne

AU - Dindler, Christian

AU - Iversen, Ole Sejer

PY - 2017/1/29

Y1 - 2017/1/29

N2 - Today, most design projects are infrastructuring projects, because they build on technologies, competencies and practices that already exist. While infrastructuring was originally seen as being full of conflicts and contradictions with what is already present, we find that many contemporary reports seem to mainly address participatory infrastructuring as horizontal co-design and local, mutual learning processes in which people attempt to make the most out of available technology.In this paper we expand our view of design activities in three dimensions: First, how participatory processes play out vertically in different political and practical arenas; second, on the back stage of design, the messy activities that occur before, between and after the participatory workshops. And third, on their reach; how they tie into existing networks across organizations, and how agency and initiatives become dispersed within these networks. To illustrate and discuss the process of participatory infrastructuring we use a case study from an educational context. This particular project contains a diverse set of design activities at many organizational levels revolving around technology, decision-making, competence-building, commitment and policy-making. The project highlights these complexities, and our discussions lead to a vocabulary for participatory infrastructuring that focuses on knotworking, rather than structure, and on both horizontal and vertical reach and sustainability. This vocabulary is grounded in the meeting of the literature on infrastructuring, participatory design, and activity theory, and leads to a revised understanding of, for example, learning and conflicts in participatory infrastructuring.

AB - Today, most design projects are infrastructuring projects, because they build on technologies, competencies and practices that already exist. While infrastructuring was originally seen as being full of conflicts and contradictions with what is already present, we find that many contemporary reports seem to mainly address participatory infrastructuring as horizontal co-design and local, mutual learning processes in which people attempt to make the most out of available technology.In this paper we expand our view of design activities in three dimensions: First, how participatory processes play out vertically in different political and practical arenas; second, on the back stage of design, the messy activities that occur before, between and after the participatory workshops. And third, on their reach; how they tie into existing networks across organizations, and how agency and initiatives become dispersed within these networks. To illustrate and discuss the process of participatory infrastructuring we use a case study from an educational context. This particular project contains a diverse set of design activities at many organizational levels revolving around technology, decision-making, competence-building, commitment and policy-making. The project highlights these complexities, and our discussions lead to a vocabulary for participatory infrastructuring that focuses on knotworking, rather than structure, and on both horizontal and vertical reach and sustainability. This vocabulary is grounded in the meeting of the literature on infrastructuring, participatory design, and activity theory, and leads to a revised understanding of, for example, learning and conflicts in participatory infrastructuring.

U2 - 10.1007/s10606-017-9268-y

DO - 10.1007/s10606-017-9268-y

M3 - Journal article

VL - 26

SP - 245

EP - 273

JO - Computer Supported Cooperative Work

JF - Computer Supported Cooperative Work

SN - 0925-9724

IS - 1-2

ER -