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René Timcenko Tronsgaard Rasmussen

High-resolution imaging of transiting extrasolar planetary systems (HITEP) II. Lucky imaging results from 2015 and 2016

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • D. F. Evans
  • J. Southworth, Keele University
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  • B. Smalley, Keele University
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  • U. G. Jørgensen, Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark and Niels Bohr Institute University of Copenhagen, DK-1350 Copenhagen, Denmark troels.haugboelle@snm.ku.dk, Niels Bohr Institute
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  • M. Dominik, University of St. Andrews
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  • M. I. Andersen, Niels Bohr Institute
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  • V. Bozza, University of Salerno, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli
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  • D. M. Bramich
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  • M. J. Burgdorf, Universitat Hamburg
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  • S. Ciceri, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg, Germany
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  • G. D'Ago, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte
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  • R. Figuera Jaimes, University of St. Andrews, European Southern Observatory
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  • S. H. Gu, Chinese Academy of Sciences
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  • T. C. Hinse, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute
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  • Th Henning, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg, Germany
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  • M. Hundertmark, Astronomisches Rechen-Institut Heidelberg
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  • N. Kains, STScI
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  • E. Kerins, Manchester University
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  • H. Korhonen, Niels Bohr Institute, Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA)
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  • R. Kokotanekova, Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Open University
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  • M. Kuffmeier, Niels Bohr Institute
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  • P. Longa-Peña, Universidad de Antofagasta
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  • L. Mancini, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg, Germany, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Napoli Capodimonte
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  • J. MacKenzie, Niels Bohr Institute
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  • A. Popovas, Niels Bohr Institute
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  • M. Rabus, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, 69117, Heidelberg, Germany, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile
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  • S. Rahvar, Sharif University of Technology
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  • S. Sajadian, Isfahan University of Technology
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  • C. Snodgrass, Open University
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  • J. Skottfelt, Open University
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  • J. Surdej, Université de Liège
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  • R. Tronsgaard
  • E. Unda-Sanzana, Universidad de Antofagasta
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  • C. Von Essen
  • Yi Bo Wang, Chinese Academy of Sciences
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  • O. Wertz, Argelander-Institut für Astronomie

Context. The formation and dynamical history of hot Jupiters is currently debated, with wide stellar binaries having been suggested as a potential formation pathway. Additionally, contaminating light from both binary companions and unassociated stars can significantly bias the results of planet characterisation studies, but can be corrected for if the properties of the contaminating star are known. Aims. We search for binary companions to known transiting exoplanet host stars, in order to determine the multiplicity properties of hot Jupiter host stars. We also search for and characterise unassociated stars along the line of sight, allowing photometric and spectroscopic observations of the planetary system to be corrected for contaminating light. Methods. We analyse lucky imaging observations of 97 Southern hemisphere exoplanet host stars, using the Two Colour Instrument on the Danish 1.54 m telescope. For each detected companion star, we determine flux ratios relative to the planet host star in two passbands, and measure the relative position of the companion. The probability of each companion being physically associated was determined using our two-colour photometry. Results. A catalogue of close companion stars is presented, including flux ratios, position measurements, and estimated companion star temperature. For companions that are potential binary companions, we review archival and catalogue data for further evidence. For WASP-77AB and WASP-85AB, we combine our data with historical measurements to determine the binary orbits, showing them to be moderately eccentric and inclined to the line of sight (and hence planetary orbital axis). Combining our survey with the similar Friends of Hot Jupiters survey, we conclude that known hot Jupiter host stars show a deficit of high mass stellar companions compared to the field star population; however, this may be a result of the biases in detection and target selection by ground-based surveys.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberA20
JournalAstronomy and Astrophysics
Volume610
IssueFebruary
Number of pages22
ISSN0004-6361
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

    Research areas

  • Dynamical evolution and stability - planets and satellites, Formation -Techniques, High angular resolution - binaries, Planets and satellites, Visual

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