Department of Biology

Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Professor Peter Teglberg Madsen

Time-varying auditory gain control in response to double-pulse stimuli in harbour porpoises is not mediated by a stapedial reflex

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Time-varying auditory gain control in response to double-pulse stimuli in harbour porpoises is not mediated by a stapedial reflex. / Schroder, Asger Emil Munch; Beedholm, Kristian; Madsen, Peter Teglberg.

In: Open Biology, Vol. 6, No. 4, 15.04.2017, p. 525-529.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{034b21b9ae8243569d62a49471a76a03,
title = "Time-varying auditory gain control in response to double-pulse stimuli in harbour porpoises is not mediated by a stapedial reflex",
abstract = "Echolocating animals reduce their output level and hearing sensitivity with decreasing echo delays, presumably to stabilize the perceived echo intensity during target approaches. In bats, this variation in hearing sensitivity is formed by a call-induced stapedial reflex that tapers off over time after the call. Here, we test the hypothesis that a similar mechanism exists in toothed whales by subjecting a trained harbour porpoise to a series of double sound pulses varying in delay and frequency, while measuring the magnitudes of the evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). We find that the recovery of the ABR to the second pulse is frequency dependent, and that a stapedial reflex therefore cannot account for the reduced hearing sensitivity at short pulse delays. We propose that toothed whale auditory time-varying gain control during echolocation is not enabled by the middle ear as in bats, but rather by frequency-dependent mechanisms such as forward masking and perhaps higher-order control of efferent feedback to the outer hair cells.",
keywords = "Toothed whale, Echolocation, Stapedial reflex, Masking, Automatic gain control, Hearing, BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN, EVOKED-POTENTIAL RECOVERY, DOUBLE CLICK STIMULATION, FALSE KILLER WHALE, HEARING SENSITIVITY, PHOCOENA-PHOCOENA, TURSIOPS-TRUNCATUS, ECHOLOCATION, SYSTEM, BATS",
author = "Schroder, {Asger Emil Munch} and Kristian Beedholm and Madsen, {Peter Teglberg}",
year = "2017",
month = apr,
day = "15",
doi = "10.1242/bio.021469",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "525--529",
journal = "Open Biology",
issn = "2046-2441",
publisher = "TheRoyal Society Publishing",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time-varying auditory gain control in response to double-pulse stimuli in harbour porpoises is not mediated by a stapedial reflex

AU - Schroder, Asger Emil Munch

AU - Beedholm, Kristian

AU - Madsen, Peter Teglberg

PY - 2017/4/15

Y1 - 2017/4/15

N2 - Echolocating animals reduce their output level and hearing sensitivity with decreasing echo delays, presumably to stabilize the perceived echo intensity during target approaches. In bats, this variation in hearing sensitivity is formed by a call-induced stapedial reflex that tapers off over time after the call. Here, we test the hypothesis that a similar mechanism exists in toothed whales by subjecting a trained harbour porpoise to a series of double sound pulses varying in delay and frequency, while measuring the magnitudes of the evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). We find that the recovery of the ABR to the second pulse is frequency dependent, and that a stapedial reflex therefore cannot account for the reduced hearing sensitivity at short pulse delays. We propose that toothed whale auditory time-varying gain control during echolocation is not enabled by the middle ear as in bats, but rather by frequency-dependent mechanisms such as forward masking and perhaps higher-order control of efferent feedback to the outer hair cells.

AB - Echolocating animals reduce their output level and hearing sensitivity with decreasing echo delays, presumably to stabilize the perceived echo intensity during target approaches. In bats, this variation in hearing sensitivity is formed by a call-induced stapedial reflex that tapers off over time after the call. Here, we test the hypothesis that a similar mechanism exists in toothed whales by subjecting a trained harbour porpoise to a series of double sound pulses varying in delay and frequency, while measuring the magnitudes of the evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). We find that the recovery of the ABR to the second pulse is frequency dependent, and that a stapedial reflex therefore cannot account for the reduced hearing sensitivity at short pulse delays. We propose that toothed whale auditory time-varying gain control during echolocation is not enabled by the middle ear as in bats, but rather by frequency-dependent mechanisms such as forward masking and perhaps higher-order control of efferent feedback to the outer hair cells.

KW - Toothed whale

KW - Echolocation

KW - Stapedial reflex

KW - Masking

KW - Automatic gain control

KW - Hearing

KW - BOTTLE-NOSED-DOLPHIN

KW - EVOKED-POTENTIAL RECOVERY

KW - DOUBLE CLICK STIMULATION

KW - FALSE KILLER WHALE

KW - HEARING SENSITIVITY

KW - PHOCOENA-PHOCOENA

KW - TURSIOPS-TRUNCATUS

KW - ECHOLOCATION

KW - SYSTEM

KW - BATS

U2 - 10.1242/bio.021469

DO - 10.1242/bio.021469

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28202466

VL - 6

SP - 525

EP - 529

JO - Open Biology

JF - Open Biology

SN - 2046-2441

IS - 4

ER -