Per Kallestrup

Low prevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies in HIV-endemic area of Zimbabwe support sexual transmission as the major route of HIV transmission in Africa

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperLetterResearchpeer-review

  • Per Kallestrup
  • Rutendo Zinyama, Zimbabwe
  • Exnevia Gomo, Zimbabwe
  • Ebbe Dickmeiss, Department of Clinical Immunology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, Denmark
  • Per Platz, Department of Clinical Immunology, Glostrup Hospital
  • ,
  • Jan Gerstoft, Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Denmark
  • Henrik Ullum, Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Immunology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, Department of Clinical Immunology, Glostrup Hospital, Denmark
Medical injections have recently been suggested to cause a large proportion of African HIV infections. If this hypothesis is true, high pre-valences of other infections transmitted by injections should be expected. In a cohort of 145 HIV-negative and 124 HIV-positive individuals from a rural area of Zimbabwe with a high HIV prevalence we only found one with antibodies to hepatitis C virus. This does not support injections playing a major role in HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAIDS
Volume17
Issue9
Pages (from-to)1400-2
Number of pages3
ISSN0269-9370
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

    Research areas

  • Antibodies, Viral, Case-Control Studies, Endemic Diseases, HIV Infections, Hepacivirus, Hepatitis C, Humans, Injections, Prevalence, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Viral, Zimbabwe

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