Per Kallestrup

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to salt consumption in Nepal: Findings from the community-based management of non-communicable diseases project in Nepal (COBIN)

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  • Kamal Ghimire, Nepal Development Society, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal., Nepal
  • Tara Ballav Adhikari
  • Anupa Rijal, Nepal Development Society, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal., Nepal
  • Per Kallestrup
  • Megan E Henry, The Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland., United States
  • Dinesh Neupane, Nepal Development Society, Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal., The Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

High salt/sodium intake is associated with an increased risk of hypertension, which is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. This paper aims to examine the association between salt consumption and salt-related knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) in Nepal. The cross-sectional data used in this study were collected as part of the community-based management of non-communicable diseases project (COBIN) to understand the amount and KAP related to salt consumption in Nepal. Multivariate hierarchical logistic regression was performed to assess the association of salt-related KAP and determinants of high salt consumption in Nepal. The mean per capita salt intake was 8.0 (±3.7) g/day, with 81.6% of the population reporting higher intake than the WHO recommendation of <5 g/day. People of upper castes [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-0.9], people in large families (aOR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.5-0.7), respondents who were advised to lower salt intake (aOR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.9) and who checked salt/sodium labels in food (aOR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.9) were less likely to consume higher amounts of salt. Similarly, people who added extra salt to their food at the table (aOR = 1.4; 95 CI: 1.1-1.9) and who reported consuming high amounts of salt (aOR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1-2.3) were more likely to have high salt intake. High salt intake was documented in this population. This study suggests the need for culturally tailored community-based behavior modification through health education and dietary counseling to effectively reduce salt consumption and thereby support a reduction in hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in Nepal.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume21
Issue6
Pages (from-to)739-748
Number of pages10
ISSN1524-6175
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Bibliographical note

©2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

    Research areas

  • Nepal, attitudes, blood pressure, dietary salt, hypertension, knowledge, practices, salt consumption, sodium

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 151312772